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Here is the sentence I'm talking about... うん、めずらしいなあ、めぐみのほうがおそいなんて

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Both words indicate a "strong sentiment", be it surprise, anger, awestricken, thankful and what have you. E.g.

ここで泊まるなんて思ってもいなかった 
あいつが首相だなんて許せない
なんて綺麗な景色なんだ
なんて面倒見のいい奴なんだろう

ここで泊まるとは思っていなかったなぁ
あいつが首相だなんて許せないなぁ
綺麗な景色だなぁ
面倒見のいい奴だなぁ

Back to your example, it's inverting the usual ordering and then adds an うん to create an even stronger effect. E.g. these are all grammatical and mean essentially the same thing (they get increasingly more dramatic):

めぐみのほうがおそいなんてめずらしいなあ
めずらしいなあ、めぐみのほうがおそいなんて
うん、めずらしいなぁ、めぐみのほうがおそいなんて

Here is a similar, but a different example:

あぁ、悲しいなぁ、あいつが死んじまったなんて  

Re: @Yuuichi's point that なんて indicates surprise, there's a lot of truth in that. One translation would be "I can't believe ...". But IMO its primarily purpose is to indicate that there is some strong sentiment (for example you can say あいつが死んじまったなんて after you know very well that the person has died).

  • The last example is interesting in that English has a similar phrase: "I can't believe <person> is really gone!". Here "belief" is more about strong emotion (having trouble adjusting to the loss of a loved one to the point that it "feels unbelievable") rather than about any actual distrust in the fact that the person has passed on. – WeirdlyCheezy Jun 5 '16 at 18:44
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なんて in this sentence is used in indicating surprise. For example, 彼が仕事を休むなんて、驚きだ(I am surprised at taking off his work). And なんて has some meanings and usage.

なあ in this sentence is used in indicating sentiment. For example, 美しいなあ、静かだなぁ etc. And なあ has also some meanings and usage.

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