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The sentence in question is "困らせちゃだめよ?". I know that 困らせ is simply a causative form of 困る and that ちゃ is a feminine casual ては. I translated the sentence to "So you're not troubled anymore, are you?" I don't know why, but I've got the nagging feeling that the translation is incorrect.

closed as off-topic by Flaw May 5 '16 at 7:26

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    Hint: 〜てはだめ is a variant of 〜てはいけない – oals Mar 1 '16 at 16:04
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    Also, context. Without any, accurate translation is often impossible. – Eiríkr Útlendi Mar 1 '16 at 17:10
  • しまった!www2.pegasusknight.com/wiki/fe14/… (Scroll down to 支援S and read the last phrase by カミラ) – user13701 Mar 1 '16 at 17:36
  • 私は自分の間違いをすまなく思っている. – user13701 Mar 1 '16 at 17:37
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    ~ちゃ for ~ては isn't necessarily feminine, but some people do think it sounds childish. – Aeon Akechi Mar 1 '16 at 17:50
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“困らせちゃだめよ” is a colloquial turn of phrase for 困らせてはいけない、which means “You mustn’t trouble (somebody).” It’s an imperative form, and reverse to “You're not troubled.” Apparently it sounds feminine. A man would say "“困らせちゃだめよ”

As I don’t know the context of the quoted phrase, I wonder why it’s trailed by a question mark.

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    You can use question marks for rising pitch even when it's not a question. I've seen よ? all the time for a sort of girly 'you really ought to know this' kind of intonation. – Sjiveru Mar 2 '16 at 0:50
  • @Sjiveru. The use of よ has nothing to do with question at all. It’s rather imperative in the nuance. Also it isn’t necessarily feminine in tone. For instance, “よせよ – Stop it,” “早くやれよ – Do it quickly,” “バカ言うんじゃねえよ – Don’t talk rubbish,” “ふざけんなよ – It’s not a joke,” “舐めんなよ- Don’t make a fool of me” sound all muscular and imperative. – Yoichi Oishi Mar 2 '16 at 1:26
  • I'm talking about よ? specifically, not just よ in general. – Sjiveru Mar 2 '16 at 1:35
  • In fact, I don't understand why "?" is added to this phrase. But forget about it . It's not a big thing to me. – Yoichi Oishi Mar 2 '16 at 1:50
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    As Sjiveru said, I think this question mark was used to add the feeling of "..., okay?" – naruto Mar 2 '16 at 4:02

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