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I've been using online tools to learn the pitch-accent rules that affect verb and adjective conjugation, and memorising the rules that govern how conjugation affects the location of the accent in words.

For example, there seems to be a rule that the gerundive (-te) and the past (-ta) conjugations shift the accent forwards one position to the syllable that contains the antepenultimate mora.

It seems also that auxiliary verbs such as the causative (-Caseru) and the passive (-Careru) carry accent on the syllable that contains their penultimate morae.

My question is whether the accent still moves forward one position in the gerundive and past conjugations of auxiliary verbs such as the causative and the past. For example, would "腫れさせられꜜる" -> "腫れさせらꜜれた" be the correct position of the accent?

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Yes, the accent still moves forward one position in the gerundive and past conjugations of auxiliary verbs such as the causative and the past.
I will give an example as follows.

書く{HL} ; 書かれる{LHHL} ; 書かせる{LHHL} ; 書かせられる{LHHHHL}

書かない{LHLL} ; 書かれない{LHHLL} ; 書かせない{LHHLL} ; 書かせられない{LHHHHLL}

書いて{HLL} ; 書かれて{LHLL} ; 書かせて{LHLL} ; 書かせられて{LHHHLL}

書いた{HLL} ; 書かれた{LHLL} ; 書かせた{LHLL} ; 書かせられた{LHHHLL}

書{か}く has the accent fall originally, so if ''-られる'' or ''-させる'' is put on the verb, the accent fall still exists.

While, ''腫{は}れる'', which is given as example in the question, doesn't have accent fall. Even if ''られる'', ''させる'', or ''させられる'' is put on a verb without any accent fall such as ''腫れる'', accent fall still does not exist.

腫れる{LHH} ; 腫れさせる{LHHHH} ; 腫れさせられる {LHHHHHH}

腫れない{LHHH} ; 腫れさせない{LHHHHH} ; 腫れさせられない{LHHHHHHH}

腫れて{LHH} ; 腫れさせて{LHHHH} ; 腫れさせられて{LHHHHHH}

腫れた{LHH} ; 腫れさせた{LHHHH} ; 腫れさせられた{LHHHHHH}

You can consider verbs with ''られる'' and ''させる'' as just verbs Group2 such as ''[食]{た}べる'', ''[開]{あ}ける'' in behavior of accent rule.
That is,

When the verb has the accent fall, [...(ら)れる]{LHHHHHHL}, [...(ら)れない]{LHHHHHHLL}, [...(ら)れた]{LHHHHHLL}, [...(ら)れて]{LHHHHHLL}

It's the same pattern as 食べる{LHL} , 食べない{LHLL}, 食べた{HLL}, 食べて{HLL}

or

When the verb doesn't have accent fall, [...(ら)れる]{LHHHHHHH}, [...(ら)れない]{LHHHHHHHH}, [...(ら)れた]{LHHHHHHH}, [...(ら)れて]{LHHHHHHH}

It's the same pattern as 開ける{LHH} , 開けない{LHHH}, 開けた{LHH}, 開けて{LHH}


(added)

Group2 means verbs whose verb basees end with vowel, such as 食{た}べる, 寝{ね}る, 着{き}る , 恥{は}じる.

While, these words as follows are categorized in another group, that is called Group1 in Japanese education.
しゃべる, 練{ね}る, 切{き}る, 走{はし}る, 書{か}く, 待{ま}つ, 飛{と}ぶ...etc.

する and 来{く}る are called Group3, each of which has irregular pattern of the inflection.

  • Group2, which grouping is that? – dainichi Dec 4 '15 at 9:12
  • I'm sorry for lack of explanation. I added the explanation about the verb groups to my post. – Toshihiko Dec 4 '15 at 10:25
  • "in Japanese education", really? I've only heard/seen 五段・一段・サ変・カ変. – dainichi Dec 6 '15 at 22:05
  • I have thought it general for foreigners to learn 五段活用動詞 as the Group1, 上一段 or 下一段活用動詞 as the group2. – Toshihiko Dec 7 '15 at 2:59
  • Re: pitch accent drop on 腫{は}れる, this verb's patterns are perhaps better considered as based on the root verb はる, from which 腫れる derives. はる{HL} → はれる{LHH}. Same as 書く{HL} → 書ける{LHH}. – Eiríkr Útlendi Oct 19 '16 at 19:59

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