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I've been thinking about a way to say

"Flash-forward two years in the future, he is now a school-teacher.

or something of the like.

二年後、彼は今教師です。

is what I thought of. Does this even make sense?

2 Answers 2

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二年後、彼は今教師です。

It only means "After two years, he is now a school-teacher." It's present event.

Japanese vocabulary doesn't have the word "flash forward", because Japanese novelists have never invented it. If your intent is to find a rhetoric to describe the future as if it's already happened, there are several ways:

二年後、そこには教師になった彼の姿が(あった!)

I think it's a wording popularized by docudrama programs, so maybe sounds too TV trope.

二年後を見てみよう。彼は今教師だ。
二年後を見てみましょう。彼は今教師です。

That's not a fixed phrase. Just manually set the scene into the future, and you can continue your talk with present tense.

二年後、彼は教師になっている。
二年後、彼は教師になっています。

This one is a steady expression to tell determined future, but the viewpoint remains in present.

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I found this expression:

  • fast-forward to the present:
    早送りして現在を見てみる

Perhaps it can be modified to:

  • fast-forward to X year:
    X年に早送りして見てみる
  • fast-forward by X years:
    X年間早送りして見てみる

Some more tries (please edit/correct/comment if it's wrong or unnatural)

  • 時計をX年進める

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