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I am trying to translate some text, but I hit a sentence that I could not understand completely.

悪いんだがここ片付けといてくれ

From what I read up to now, this means something like "This place is in bad shape. Clean it." roughly speaking, but I am having trouble understanding the 片付けといてくれ part. jisho.org simplifies it to 片付けて, but there seems to be so much lost in this simplification. What exactly does this extra part mean?

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    Are you familiar with 〜ておく?
    – user1478
    Jun 30, 2015 at 5:33
  • @snailboat It means some thing like "going to", right? Like in an uncertain future. Jun 30, 2015 at 5:38
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    悪いんだが = sorry to trouble you but. 片付けといてくれ = 片付け + て + おい + て + くれ, and くれ is a casual (and somewhat curt) form of ください (= please). Thus 悪いんだがここ片付けといてくれ = would you mind cleaning up this place (while I am out)?
    – eltonjohn
    Jun 30, 2015 at 6:02
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    悪いんだが = sorry to trouble you and といてくれ = would you mind ? great keigo usage.
    – oldergod
    Jun 30, 2015 at 8:34
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    @oldergod ふふふ 職場でそのまま使っちゃたらやば~いww
    – chocolate
    Jun 30, 2015 at 16:40

1 Answer 1

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I would like to wrap up.

〜しておく = (be sure) to do 〜

悪いんだが (<- 悪い + の + だ + が)= sorry to trouble you but

片付けといてくれ = 片付け + て + おい (<- おく) + て + くれ

where くれ is a casual (and somewhat curt) form of ください (= please).

Thus, together

悪いんだがここ片付けといてくれ = would you mind cleaning up this place (while I am out)?

But the original phrase sounds much less polite. So I would suggest "Mind cleaning up this place, will ya? (Coz I wanna go out.)"

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