5

The first sentence of the second paragraph of the article titled モンテ、ナビスコ初戦快勝 in Yomiuri Shinbun is written in the present tense (or possibly the future tense I guess):
序盤、何度も相手ゴールに迫るが、得点に結びつかない。

But, the article is describing a past event. And, all the rest of the article is written in the past tense.

What is going on?

  • keep in mind it's a newspaper -- even English is radically different in front-page print. – sova Mar 19 '15 at 16:30
  • In japanese sense, if just only last sentence is past tense, we don't care. To all sentence is past tense is rather rare. – Takahiro Waki Oct 4 '16 at 1:03
2

I would say : instead of presenting it as a simple given event, he summarizes the beginning of the match, kind of headlining what happened during this opening, making it last longer in the readers mind. So you could say it is a historic present.

1

I've found an explanation on how tense switching works here:

A part of a past event (often a state rather than an action) can be described using the nonpast tense, if the writer perceives it to be relatively unimportant circumstantial information that has no direct bearing upon the major story line.

Just in case, I've scanned the relevant bits that work through an example.

1234

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.