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I'm going through some comments on an old blog and came across this dictation of an interview that's gotten me a bit befuddled. The seiyuu's asking the writer about what will happen to the seiyuu's character in the following year.

声優さん「婿でもいいです、この際」

作家さん「それでもありちゅーかありじゃないですか? …どうしようか…」

The writer's wording confused me tbh, so randomly guessing I think it's something like:

Seiyuu: At this rate, he could even become a groom.

Writer: That's possible as well, isn't it? What to do do...

If anyone could confirm/correct me with an explanation of what 'ありちゅーかありじゃないですか?' means I'd be very grateful.

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  • それでもあり: that'll be fine too
  • ちゅーか: contracted ていうか, which is a colloquial expression meaning "or rather".
  • あり: fine
  • じゃないですか?: isn't it?

Saying それでも implies there is other ideal options, and 婿 is not the best (See this answer about でいい and でもいい).

作家さん first said それでもあり, implying 婿 is a possible alternative which may be selected reluctantly. Then he rethought it and repeated ありじゃないですか without それでも, indicating 婿 may be a really good option.

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  • Thank you very much for the very detailed and helpful reply! – user7541 Mar 7 '15 at 8:16
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Sometimes people shorten 「ていうか」with 「ちゅうーか」, your translation looks pretty correct to me :).

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