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Dear fellow lovers of the Japanese language, please bear with my possibly foolish question.

I've come across this sentence in a visual novel (Fate/Stay Night): が、人の噂など当てにならないのが常だ。こんな勝負を持ち出すあたり、男嫌いというより、単に今まで興味がなかっただけかもしれない。

I'm not sure as to what exactly "あたり" means in this context. Is it the usual meaning as a noun (success / vicinity), or something else? Can it be replaced with something like のは without the sentence losing much of its original meaning?

Thank you for your patience.

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    @virmaior This is not 当たり but 辺り which doesn't usually conjugate.
    – naruto
    Commented Feb 12, 2015 at 23:52
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    That is not "at the end of a sentence". It is right in the middle of it.
    – user4032
    Commented Feb 12, 2015 at 23:57
  • That あたり is "circumstances".
    – user4092
    Commented Feb 13, 2015 at 8:25

1 Answer 1

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"Is it the usual meaning as a noun (success / vicinity), or something else?"

You are thinking of another word 「[当]{あ}たり」 as you mention "success". "Vicinity", however, is strongly related to the word in question.

This one is 「[辺]{あた}り」. 「当たり」 and 「辺り」 are pronounced differently as well -- pitch accent-wise, that is.

This usage of 「~~~あたり」(It is more than O.K. to write it in kana.) may not be easy for the learner. It is a somewhat euphemistic way of giving an example and making a comment about it.

The structure is 「(an example) + あたり + (speaker's comment or opinion)」. 

"Can it be replaced with something like のは without the sentence losing much of its original meaning?"

Good insight! That is exactly what I meant by "euphemistic".

If you said something like "~~が~~するのは~~だ", it could at times sound too straightforward and/or judgemental. By using 「あたり」, you can soften things a little without changing the meaning.

「こんな勝負を持ち出すあたり、~~~」 means:

"Her proposing a match like that, for instance, (makes me wonder ~~~~)"

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    It might be easier to comprehend when you add "こんな勝負を持ち出す辺り(からみて/からいえば)", etc.
    – Yosh
    Commented Feb 13, 2015 at 5:12

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