4

Dear fellow lovers of the Japanese language, please bear with my possibly foolish question.

I've come across this sentence in a visual novel (Fate/Stay Night): が、人の噂など当てにならないのが常だ。こんな勝負を持ち出すあたり、男嫌いというより、単に今まで興味がなかっただけかもしれない。

I'm not sure as to what exactly "あたり" means in this context. Is it the usual meaning as a noun (success / vicinity), or something else? Can it be replaced with something like のは without the sentence losing much of its original meaning?

Thank you for your patience.

  • 2
    @virmaior This is not 当たり but 辺り which doesn't usually conjugate. – naruto Feb 12 '15 at 23:52
  • 1
    That is not "at the end of a sentence". It is right in the middle of it. – l'électeur Feb 12 '15 at 23:57
  • That あたり is "circumstances". – user4092 Feb 13 '15 at 8:25
6

"Is it the usual meaning as a noun (success / vicinity), or something else?"

You are thinking of another word 「[当]{あ}たり」 as you mention "success". "Vicinity", however, is strongly related to the word in question.

This one is 「[辺]{あた}り」. 「当たり」 and 「辺り」 are pronounced differently as well -- pitch accent-wise, that is.

This usage of 「~~~あたり」(It is more than O.K. to write it in kana.) may not be easy for the learner. It is a somewhat euphemistic way of giving an example and making a comment about it.

The structure is 「(an example) + あたり + (speaker's comment or opinion)」. 

"Can it be replaced with something like のは without the sentence losing much of its original meaning?"

Good insight! That is exactly what I meant by "euphemistic".

If you said something like "~~が~~するのは~~だ", it could at times sound too straightforward and/or judgemental. By using 「あたり」, you can soften things a little without changing the meaning.

「こんな勝負を持ち出すあたり、~~~」 means:

"Her proposing a match like that, for instance, (makes me wonder ~~~~)"

  • 1
    It might be easier to comprehend when you add "こんな勝負を持ち出す辺り(からみて/からいえば)", etc. – Yosh Feb 13 '15 at 5:12

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.