4

Hope this is an appropriate question!

I visited Tokyo back in September and got by on some very basic Japanese (though more often with the help of their good grasp on English).

Anyway, there was a couple of times I heard as a parting phrase... once from a barman and I believe another in a restaurant. I thought it was just "arimasu" or "arimasen" by itself though I may have missed a particle or other word. I tried to look it up when I was there and have searched many times over the last few months to decipher it but with no luck.

The curiosity is still getting to me, could anyone here shed some light on how that might be used as a parting phrase?

  • 3
    Are you sure it wasn't just ありがとうございます spoken very quickly? – istrasci Jan 27 '15 at 18:12
  • That's one phrase I definitely know and used a lot and this phrase that I'm questioning usually came after I'd said ありがとうございます. Perhaps it was just casually delivered, I did hear it in places that were a bit more local than touristy. Does arimasu / arimasen ever get used in a social context by themselves? – Leonard Jan 27 '15 at 18:51
  • I would suggest something along the lines of "お客様が帰りです" but I can't find the exact phrase they use online... – Urukann Jan 28 '15 at 2:19
7

I guess you've misheard heavily slurred ありがとうございます.

When spoken very quickly, ありがとうございます can be pronounced like ありゃーっす! or ありわーっす! or あざーっす! And ありがとうございました can be more like ありゃーしたぁ! or あーした!

Similarly, slurred いらっしゃいませ can sound like しあわせ, ラッシュアワースリー, or even エアロスミス.

  • Reading "ありわーっす" that seems familiar. It's hard to tell now so much time has passed but this sounds like a winner. Thank you! – Leonard Jan 28 '15 at 12:29
  • This is the best answer I've ever read on JLU. あざーっっっす! – ジョン Jan 29 '15 at 7:15
-1

Combining the comments on your question, when leaving a Japanese-style restaurant in Japan the following is not uncommon.

When you have just paid the bill and turn towards the door.

Staff:お客様お帰りです / お客様帰ります / Some other form of "The customer is leaving" depending on local accents

The customer may also add a ごちそうさまでした or ありがとうございます whilst paying or on their way towards the door.

As naruto adds, and personal experience follows; especially in Tokyo you find a fair amount of restaurants where the staff exclaim あざーすありざーす or some other shortened form of ありがとう.

  • That seems familiar from a few places. I had no idea what they were saying so I just smiled and said thank you as it seemed appropriate! Good to know. – Leonard Jan 28 '15 at 12:28

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