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This question already has an answer here:

Was not sure how to title my question because I don't know who to explain such grammar pattern.

I came across something like that in Tae Kim's guide:

勉強をすればするほど、頭がよくなるよ。 (The more you study, the more you will become smarter.)

But it seems it only applies to verbs, "the more you do something, the more something will happen".

I was wondering how to say something like "the earlier we leave, the earlier we'll arrive", "the faster you run, the faster you'll get tired" etc?

Those grammar patterns are similar in English but I have a feeling they're not that similar in Japanese and I have no idea how to find something like that.

marked as duplicate by Flaw, Earthliŋ, broccoli forest, ssb, snailcar Jan 26 '15 at 0:36

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • Look at the other topic posted in @Flaw's comment. But I'm confused about what you're asking. You say the ~ば~ほど pattern only applies to verbs, but then you list two more examples that also have verbs. Are you specifically looking for instances of using a pattern like this with nouns? Or just confused on it in general? – istrasci Jan 24 '15 at 18:11
  • @istrasci I guess what he or she is asking is whether it is possible to apply the ~ば~ほど pattern to adverbs to express "the earlier we leave, the earlier we'll arrive", "the faster you run, the faster you'll get tired", etc., and in the case it is not, what the appropriate expression should be. – null Jan 24 '15 at 18:27
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    @Noir We've had a question like that, too: using 〜ば〜ほど with adverbs – Earthliŋ Jan 24 '15 at 21:34
  • @Earthliŋ Cool. Thanks for pointing that out :) – null Jan 24 '15 at 22:04
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Personally, I do not think Japanese has a "patterned" grammar even if you want it so much since it is a completely different language.

勉強をすればするほど、頭がよくなるよ。 (The more you study, the more you will become smarter.)

But it seems it only applies to verbs, "the more you do something, the more something will happen".

What do you try to mean by saying "it seems it only applies to verbs"?

For example, 頭が良い人程、理論的に話す。In English "The smarter the person is, the more logically he/she speaks". Now in the English sentence this phrase is sure, you need the be-verb, however in Japanese the first sentence only has the noun before 程, so I am afraid to say your assumption could not be applied here.

As for now the alternative pick of my way of saying "the more 〜, the more" can not come up in my mind other than 程. When it comes up, I would like to insert them in the comment box.

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    In your answer, you both claim there is no "patterned" grammar and that "the more 〜, the more" = "~[程]{ほど},〜"... These claims are opposites. – virmaior Jan 24 '15 at 18:57
  • Hm.. I'm sorry I do not understand your questions correctly however, it seems there is a "grammar" according to here. japanese-revision.tumblr.com/post/37974380512/… I'd like to ask Japanese teacher who I know and who is teaching south Asians. – Kentaro Tomono Jan 24 '15 at 20:49
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    質問ではなく、コメント。上に書いてあるは「I do not think Japanese has a "patterned" grammar even though if you want it so much since it is completely a different language」。下に書いてあるは「As for now the alternative pick of my way of saying "the more 〜, the more" can not come up in my mind other than 程. 」すなわち、上に文法形がないと言いているが、下にあると表している。どちがあっていますか。 – virmaior Jan 25 '15 at 1:29

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