1

I think I've translated this correctly, but I started to have doubts about a few words and decided to double-check.

(person A) 結婚なんて。。。めんどくせーこと オレはやめとくか。。。

(person B) ああ。。。。。

On my first reading, I understood this to come to the meaning of:

"Something like marriage...it's tiresome. I might pass on it..."

"Yeah....."

(For context, there's been some vagueness as to whether person A and B's relationship is romantic or not, and the conversation takes place in a happy dream of person A's, in which he and person B are watching two married couples- one blissful, the other nagging.)

There are a few points I'm feeling a little paranoid about and would like some clarification on:

1- I'm aware that なんて can be used to express disdain towards the noun prior and sorta replaces は. It's with that sort of understanding that I made the above translation (I used 'something like marriage' instead of just 'marriage is' to better suit the pause). But I noticed that なんて can also be used to mean 'and the like', so for a moment I wavered on whether the sentence meant marriage or all romantic matters in general, but then decided it was probably focused on marriage alone due to the context and use of こと.

2- I'm assuming か was added to the end of the sentence as an indicator of the speaker wondering-out-loud, but when I thought about it, it could've just been there due to the speaker's speech pattern (they tend to say a lot of things like 行くか, やるか, etc.) which would change the translation of their second sentence to "I guess I'll pass on it."

3- I assumed the "ああ" was spoken in a 'ditto' sort of way, with the implication of person B agreeing that marriage was too bothersome to deal with. Endless limits of interpretation aside, can I just check if there's anything in the structure of the first speaker's sentence that strongly suggests -in the linguistic sense- another implication to the meaning of the reply?

Any opinions/corrections would be greatly appreciated.

closed as off-topic by ssb, Szymon, Sjiveru, Earthliŋ, virmaior Oct 22 '14 at 11:40

  • This question does not appear to be about the Japanese language within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 3
    This question appears to be off-topic because it is several questions combined into one. It might be more beneficial and clearer if you separate these into individual, more focused questions about the particular parts that give you trouble. – ssb Oct 21 '14 at 1:31
  • Oh, sorry about that. I thought since they weren't really questions so much as worries it'd be fine to leave them in one post. Now I've gotten a second opinion, so my mind's at ease. I'll be more careful next time! – user7541 Oct 23 '14 at 20:27
1

Your translation looks OK.

"there's been some vagueness as to whether person A and B's relationship is romantic or not..."

Even though Person B's line is only 「ああ・・」, I would think he is a man. A woman would rarely, if ever, say that as a reply to a statement.

"so for a moment I wavered on whether the sentence meant marriage or all romantic matters in general, but then decided it was probably focused on marriage alone due to the context and use of こと."

You appear to have made the right decision. Though A's line is short, it does not sound like he is not interested in ANY kind of romantic relationship. It sounds like marriage is the only thing he is uneager to pursue.

"2- I'm assuming か was added to the end of the sentence as an indicator of the speaker wondering-out-loud, but when I thought about it, it could've just been there due to the speaker's speech pattern (they tend to say a lot of things like 行くか, やるか, etc.) which would change the translation of their second sentence to "I guess I'll pass on it.""

I could not know his speech pattern without more context, but as a Japanese-speaker, I do know that it is completely natural for him to end that sentence with a か. Without it, it would become too firm a statement of giving up getting married for good.

"3- I assumed the "ああ" was spoken in a 'ditto' sort of way, with the implication of person B agreeing that marriage was too bothersome to deal with. Endless limits of interpretation aside, can I just check if there's anything in the structure of the first speaker's sentence that strongly suggests -in the linguistic sense- another implication to the meaning of the reply?"

There is absolutely nothing A's statement that suggests another implication in any way.

  • Ah no, person B is definitely a woman, admittedly one with a rather masculine way of speaking. Thank you for the information and opinion! – user7541 Oct 23 '14 at 20:29