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The line:

今のは心が響いてくるなんてレベルじゃなかった。流れ込む意識の奔流に一瞬、自我を奪われてしまっていた.

Can anyone explain what the 心が響いてくる part means?

Thanks.

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    Do you understand that the phrase "~なんてレベルじゃなかった" here means "~~ is an understatement"? (心に響いてくるなんてレベルじゃなかった=I was way more than just impressed.)
    – user1016
    Sep 1, 2014 at 6:07
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    Yes I do. It's pretty obvious from the second line and the characters reaction.
    – user6981
    Sep 1, 2014 at 6:20

2 Answers 2

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There is a metaphorical idiom "心に響く", which usually means "move/touch one's heart":

心に響くおもてなし

そのスピーチは私の心に響いた

But this line is from some science fiction or fantasy novel, right?

In the second sentence, the speaker is experiencing something very unreal; the "consciousness" of someone else is wildly rushing into his mind. Probably he is summoning a ghost, or experimenting with telepathy.

So in this context, I think "心が響いてくる" is not a metaphor, but a literal description of what is happening here; "(someone else's) heart begins resonating (with the speaker's mind)."

The speaker thought that putting his (supernatural) experience as "echoing" or "resonating" was too mild, and rephrased it as "流れ込む意識の奔流" (rush of consciousness (actually) flowing into my mind), which had almost taken over his own self.

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    This pretty much explained what happend. One of the characters has the ability (although unwanted) to transfer their feelings and thoughts unconsciously, But this time instead of that happening it caused everyone to have a vision/flashback/etc of the characters past.
    – user6981
    Sep 1, 2014 at 6:27
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It does not mean anything. It is a mistake made probably by a native speaker with low-education level. The person probably intended 心に響いてくる lit. '(the sound) resounds to the heart'. It is a metaphor, its actual meaning being '(the sound) moves the heart' (also a metaphor in English).

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    Please keep comments both civil and on-topic, nothing in the comment thread here was worth keeping.
    – jkerian
    Sep 1, 2014 at 4:45

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