0

I see ~だって in combination with some nouns in various sentences from different resources during my studies. I'm confused about it as I don't really understand it or know how to include it in my speaking practice. Thanks for the help!

Example sentences edited in from comment:

  1. 「いつまでねてるの。はやくおきなさい。」 「だってねむいんだもん。」
    "How long do you plan on sleeping? Hurry up and wake up!" "But I'm sleepy!"
  1. 「テストの点、よかったんだって?」 「うん、だって簡単だもん。」
    "I heard you did good on your test?" "Yeah, but it was really easy."
  1. だれだってそんなことはしっているさ。
    Everybody knows that.
  1. 「また新しい靴買ったの?」 「だって、安かったんだもん。」
    You bought another pair of shoes? Because they are cheap.
4
  • There are several possibilities. Can you provide some example sentences? Commented Jun 11 at 20:39
  • From what i've read, it`s almost like it's used as an elevated emotion to emphasize a justification or a reason of some kind? I'm sorry, I can't make an example sentence right now, I'm still new to it. Commented Jun 11 at 20:59
  • I didn't mean invent your own sentence. I meant copy one/some of the sentences you've seen elsewhere. Commented Jun 11 at 21:14
  • Oh of course, my bad. I found some: 「いつまでねてるの。はやくおきなさい。」 「だってねむいんだもん。」 "How long do you plan on sleeping? Hurry up and wake up!" "But I'm sleepy!" 「tesuto no ten, yokattan datte?」 「un, datte kantan damon.」 "I heard you did good on your test?" "Yeah, but it was really easy." だれだってそんなことはしっているさ。 Everybody knows that. 「また新しい靴買ったの?」 「だって、安かったんだもん。」 You bought another pair of shoes? Because they are cheap. Commented Jun 11 at 21:20

1 Answer 1

1

This is not a "conjugation", and not a suffix or "combined with nouns" - certainly not in these examples, anyway.

Conceptually, it is the ordinary copula だ plus the contraction って, which stands for a variety of things involving quotative と.

However, the combination だって is better understood as a set expression: a sort of colloquial interjection, typically used at the beginning of a sentence.

At the beginning of a sentence (the うん in example 2 doesn't really count for anything), it is a sort of conjunctive, colloquial "but" in reply to what someone else said. The underlying idea is that the だ (even if it grammatically should be のだ or んだ) is some kind of wrapper for the previous statement then that is quoted with と and then discussed. Here って is something like とは or perhaps と言ってのは.

Cure Dolly's model for this is that the previous sentence is the implied subject (or topic) for だ, and something like そう is a copular completion. (I find this a little unsatisfactory, simply because そうだって doesn't get used explicitly as far as I'm aware.) There are other possible models, I'm sure, e.g. leaning on explanatory-の (but then we have to explain where the ん・の disappeared to).

But either way, we get something like: "(saying) that it's (insert what you said here) (topic marker)" - or in more natural English: "About that,".

In example 2, we can also see an example of explicit joining with the explanatory の form んだ: there is the verb よかった plus explanatory んだ plus って that perhaps stands for something like と言って (with a further implied ことがある). We have "It was good" + explanatory-の + "it is said that (preceding bit)"; thus "I heard that it went well". (Using って directly would be too rough, and I think it would instead get interpreted like "For you to say that it went well [is somehow inappropriate]...".)

[誰]{だれ}だって is more or less the same as [誰]{だれ}でも, so "anyone" or "whoever". Again: "it's anyone" is quoted and topicalized: i.e., the upcoming statement (そんなことはしっているさ) could be about anyone, thus is equally true of everyone.

Bonus: Naruto's sentence-ending だってばよ! seems to be built off this. Here 〜ってば is 〜と言えば, so the underlying idea is "[and] if [I] say it, [you should believe it]!"

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .