3

This comes from Hunter x Hunter, where a character is describing the 語源 of じゃんけん to two main characters:

そしてグ ~ は外部破壊のための 「 拳 」 。
その昔破壊のみを求めていると誤解されて →
武術全般が 「 邪拳 」> と呼ばれ迫害禁止されていた頃 →
武闘家は戯れるふりをして修行を続けたという 。
ジャンケンの語源はその当時の 「 邪拳 」 にあるって説だわさ。
[Fist] And rock represents a punch with the fist to deal external damage.
[Evil Fist] Long ago, when martial arts were mistaken as purely destructive and banned as an evil art, martial artists trained by playing this game.
And that's how rock-paper-scissors came to be.

The presence of the one of the verbs are not in the translation, but the character says that martial arts were at large 1.) called "Evil Fist", 2.) (martial artists) were persecuted, and 3.) (martial arts) were banned.

What I wonder is the use of the single suru (されていた) acting on both 迫害 and 禁止 (seiyuu does pause between the two nouns briefly): is this a typical/common usage in speech?
When can you use just one する for multiple する-verbs?
To me it feels quite terse like a newspaper headline.

1 Answer 1

2

What I wonder is the use of the single suru (されていた) acting on both 迫害 and 禁止 (seiyuu does pause between the two nouns briefly): is this a typical/common usage in speech?

The sentence is understandable as-is, but I'd say it's poorly written. A comma or nakaguro () should usually be placed between 迫害 and 禁止. In speech, a small pause simulating a comma is enough.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .