1

I know this question had already been answered on this site, but I need someone to help me understand it in a specific context. This is a sentence from my Shin Kanzen Master N3 textbook:

林先生の授業(____)、教師が一方的に知識を伝え、学生は黙って教わる、というやり方ではありません。

My answer was originally には, as I had thought that the student is talking about what is happening "in" the teacher's lesson, but the lesson also needs a subject marker. However, the answer was just は. This led me to be very confused about the nuances between these forms and how exactly I can tell them apart in the case of a JLPT exam like this.

1
  • 1
    Perhaps it would help to see how you are translating the whole sentence. Apr 14 at 16:21

1 Answer 1

1

First, if you want to start the sentence with "In Hayashi-sensei's class", the correct particle that corresponds to this "in" is (は), not (は). If you have forgotten the difference between で and に as a location marker, please review your textbook. When you start a sentence with には, people expect a verb of existence such as ある and いる.

After changing には to では, your sentence will be "grammatical":

林先生の授業では、教師が一方的に知識を伝え、学生は黙って教わる、というやり方ではありません。
In Hayashi-sensei's class, [it] is not conducted in a manner where the teacher unilaterally imparts knowledge and the students silently learn.

But this sentence still looks a bit puzzling when interpreted in isolation; there is no explicit subject that matches the predicate, やり方ではありません. I used "it" in the English version, but what does this "it" refer to?

By using は, you can specify the subject and the topic at the same time. Note that, in Japanese, "授業が(such-and-such)というやり方だ" is a natural sentence where the subject (授業) and the predicate (やり方だ) are perfectly matched.

林先生の授業、教師が一方的に知識を伝え、学生は黙って教わる、というやり方ではありません。
Hayashi-sensei's class is not conducted in a manner where the teacher unilaterally imparts knowledge and the students silently learn.

Now the location marker (で/in) has been removed from 授業/class, but the subject and the predicate are explicitly expressed, so the sentence makes sense on its own.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .