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I am a beginner in learning japanese and I've seen many different takes on grammar and where to place verbs, subjects, etc. I know it's a subject-object-verb language and I want to be sure I have the correct order. The sentence is supposed to translate to 'you wanted this' because I am making an album. I also have heard that 'anata' and 'kimi' are considered rude in certain situations and wanted to know if I should get rid of it here.

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    Your sentence is grammatically perfect, but being grammatical doesn't necessarily mean it's natural. Unfortunately, it's very hard to suggest a revised version without more context. A natural version will depend on who you are, when and how this sentence is used, and what are you trying to present by saying "you wanted this".
    – naruto
    Mar 21 at 1:47

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Strictly speaking, I see no grammatical faults here. You should try to gain a general familiarity with は and understand that it is not a grammatical subject marker, but a topic marker, even if it is often natural to use は rather than が to mark what would be a subject in the English translation. SOV is the most common word order for Japanese, but it is not strictly necessary, as grammatical subjects, direct objects and indirect objects are explicitly marked using が・を・に.

Regarding あなた・きみ you should read Is it offensive to say あなた? and In actual Japanese society, how often are second-person pronouns used?. For something like this I would not mention the "you" at all, as the context clearly implies it. I probably wouldn't mention the "this", either, frankly.

For an album title, I could imagine something like 望んでいたところ(だ)working (see e.g. this previous Q&A for ところ). In present tense, simple 望むところ is a recorded idiom. But that's assuming that 望む has the nuance you want; it's a less commonly used word (though not rare either) than 欲しい for example.

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    望むところだ usually means "That's what I want/expect", especially when it's used without context.
    – naruto
    Mar 21 at 5:50

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