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Does it mean anything when a sentence ends with にな?

I've come across this several times, and have listed some examples below.

  • ああ ツイてねえことにな
  • ヤツは扉を塞いだ 馬が通れない程度にな
  • まるで 最初からいなかったみたいにな
  • 生活のために 金品を借りて回ってたときにな

It seems like the first one could be an abbreviation of になった, but I'm not sure.

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  • Based on a quick googling, looks like 2) and 4) come from Attack on Titan.
    – Andrew T.
    Commented Feb 29 at 7:20
  • Yeah, 1), 2), and 4) all do. 3) is from Cowboy Bebop (The Movie)
    – Blake
    Commented Feb 29 at 9:12

2 Answers 2

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This な is a masculine filler particle meaning almost nothing. It could have been ね or さ depending on the speaker's way of speaking. Even if you explicitly translate it, it is no more than "you know" or "huh".

Therefore, you can ignore the な and interpret each sentence as a sentence ending with に. The に in those four sentences work slightly differently, but fundamentally, they adverbially modifiy something (e.g., the verb in the previous sentence).

ああ ツイてねえことに
Yeah, unfortunately.

ヤツは扉を塞いだ、馬が通れない程度に。
He blocked the door enough that a horse couldn't pass through.
(An inverted/倒置 version of ヤツは馬が通れない程度に扉を塞いだ)

まるで 最初からいなかったみたいに。
(It was) as if they were not there from the beginning!
(See the previous sentence, there must be a verb that can follow this)

生活のために金品を借りて回ってたときに。
(It happened) when I was going around borrowing money and goods for a living.

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It is rather に (the usual particle, typically meaning location) + , which is an ending particle that means:

3 活用語の終止形、助詞に付く。

軽い断定・主張の意を表す。「これは失敗だ—」

So virtually it means nothing. (You may have seen な used in an imperative, which is the same particle used in a different sense.) But usually な sounds masculine.

For the second one, it is in 倒置法 (rhetoric to add emphasis by inverting word order). In the standard order, it will be:

ヤツは馬が通れない程度に塞いだ

(Note な must be dropped since it is an ending particle). The sentence moves 馬が通れない程度に to the last and adds な (for weak emphasis).

The others adds information to things previously spoken by the interlocutor. Translationwise, な can be understood as And it was.... E.g., It is our bad luck (that ....)

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