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The other meanings I'm referring to are from noun + よろしく (as if) and よろしく ... べし (by all means). I wonder why it also lacks some meanings from よく, as よろしい is the respectful form of よい, I think. I think it may be because of the respect that よろしく has in comparison to よく. (I saw other posts on よろしく but didn't see it's origin)

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    Can you elaborate your question? Do you understand よろし and よし are different words? よろしく does not contain よく.
    – naruto
    Feb 19 at 1:32
  • What, I thought that 宜しい was a respectful form of よい/よし I don't think that makes my question any less valid, does it?
    – Star Peep
    Feb 19 at 1:35
  • I searched よろし up and saw that it has a less high evaluation in comparison to よし... I wonder if よろしく...べし comes from meaning 4 of よく on goo dictionary
    – Star Peep
    Feb 19 at 1:50

1 Answer 1

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In Old Japanese, よし meant "excellent", but よろし was a different adjective that had mixed connotations like "satisfactory", "not bad", "so-so", "mundane", "appropriate", etc. So よろしくお願いします is a modest request for a treatment that is fair enough; it's not a word that asks for excellency.

Likewise, ~よろしく as a suffix has a connotation like "not perfect but good enough to be passable as ~". I couldn't find any explanation regarding how and when よろしく started to work as a suffix, but considering that よろし was sometimes used in a sarcastic or negative manner, it doesn't seem surprising.

よろしく meaning "by all means" seems to be a kanbun kundoku tradition. I have never seen this sense appear in normal Japanese sentences, including classical ones.

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  • I feel bummed out now that I found out that there's to clear explanation as to why よろしく as a suffix can mean an ironic as if
    – Star Peep
    Feb 19 at 2:01
  • I'm still confused on よろしく... べし. I think よろしい is like いい加減 and then べし is setting a standard. Actually the answer was that not excellent but not passable was the sense that the suffix よろしく meaning ように came from
    – Star Peep
    Feb 19 at 2:05
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    @StarPeep It is usually used sarcastically, but not always. As for "by all means", the kanbun kundoku tradition means that it may be related to the Chinese use of the kanji 宜 (which I know nothing about) but has little to do with the history of the Japanese adjective よろし.
    – naruto
    Feb 19 at 2:22

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