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I think it is rather clear if one listens to enough Japanese songs that "夢" is used all the time; it is in many corporate messages as well from the commercials I recall. As a song example, I am currently studying 心臓 by TOOBOE, and this line is the first:

ある日アンタは言った「私に夢の続き見せて」と

The song and music video clearly present a false idea of love by the narrator, but why "dream" here? I assume "dream" here refers to the idea of what their relationship will become of (thus "dream" is synonymous with "ideal" or "outcome"), and how the partner seeks to know what the other will do next, but is this to assume that no other word can convey this concept?

つまり, when the word "夢" is said, is the idea of "outcome/future" the right synonym?

EDIT: "夢" is "dream," yes, but that does not explain why it is used all the time when it comes to relationships and slogan-ing.

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  • ""夢" is "dream," yes, but that does not explain why it is used all the time when it comes to relationships and slogan-ing." - I don't understand the question; or rather, I don't understand how there can be anything to ask. It seems obvious to me that the English "dream" has all the same connotations, and is a reasonable gloss; I can't understand why you'd think the English word "dream" would sound out of place in a translation of the line. "The _ of your dreams" is a standard English idiom. Dec 21, 2023 at 20:06
  • I just think that "dream" is a metaphor they like to use a lot. In the context of the song, is something the author made his girlfriend desire in someway; something she has dreamed of. So, yes, when is said you can usually interpret it as a desired outcome/future. Dec 21, 2023 at 20:07
  • @KarlKnechtel, I never hear "dream" often enough in English, but I have seen it in many things Japanese. I will acknowledge that English has a lot more words: motivation, goal, desire, and the such can be used interchangeably to refer to just what one seeks, so I was hoping to get some input as to whether this reflects why 夢 is used a lot (since there are less synonyms) or whether for some other reason I am not aware of. In most cases, "dream" is just the one you get in sleep and used metamorphically to refer to what one wants. Yet these uses of the word can not reflect the uses in Japanese.
    – BigRigz
    Dec 21, 2023 at 20:21
  • @BigRigz I see your point. I speak Portuguese (native) as well, and some common Japanese idioms that contain 夢 are usually phrased without its equivalent translation in English and in Portuguese, e.g. 子供の頃の夢. But I think you might be overreacting a bit. I've never noticed how frequently it has been used in lyrics and in slogans, but in every language and culture there are words that are more preferred than others; as it turns out, 夢 could just be a word japanese advertisers/artists like a lot. Dec 21, 2023 at 20:57
  • Also this is completely off-topic as it is not relevant to the question, but he sings 言った and not 言って in the beginning of the song. Dec 21, 2023 at 21:00

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The song and music video clearly present a false idea of love by the narrator, but why "dream" here? I assume "dream" here refers to the idea of what their relationship will become of (thus "dream" is synonymous with "ideal" or "outcome"), and how the partner seeks to know what the other will do next, but is this to assume that no other word can convey this concept?

I really struggle with following your logic... I don't understand why you thought there was no word to convey the concepts of ideal and outcome. Of course, we do have words for them. I also don't understand how you'd come up with the interpretation of "continuation of the outcome" or "continuation of the ideal" from the context of the lyrics, including the music video. I don't understand which part of the lyrics represent "the false idea of love".

Based on the music video, "Show me the continuation of my dream" may have been a (fairly roundabout) way of making a marriage proposal. Isn't it sufficient to simply think that having a wonderful romance and building a happy home was the dream of the person?

when the word "夢" is said, is the idea of "outcome/future" the right synonym?

No.

"夢" is "dream," yes, but that does not explain why it is used all the time when it comes to relationships and slogan-ing.

Do corporate slogans really feature the word 夢 so frequently? I couldn't think of any. After googling, I found something like this and this, but it's far from "all the time". Tokyo Disneyland is often nicknamed as 夢の国, and a red-light district is sometimes poetically described as something like 一夜限りの夢, but I suppose these are expressions English speakers can easily understand.

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  • Sorry for the hideous question; with time it just did not sound coherent, and maybe I should have pondered it a bit more.
    – BigRigz
    Dec 25, 2023 at 2:00

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