2

So I know about the fact that Japanese doesn't have a literal equivalent to the third conditional of english.

But to say:

If I had eaten ice cream, my stomach would have hurt.

Can I say it in japanese as:

もしアイスクリームを食べたら、お腹が痛くなったでしょう。

And can I say "If I had come to Japan, I would have stayed in a hotel" as

もし日本へ行ったら、ホテルに泊まりましたでしょう。

1 Answer 1

3

This type of conditional is usually translated using -ていれば or -ていたなら. The result part can be in either -ただろう/-たでしょう or -ていただろう/-ていたでしょう.

If I had eaten ice cream, my stomach would have hurt.
もしアイスクリームを食べていれば、お腹が痛くなっていただろう。
もしアイスクリームを食べていたなら、お腹が痛くなっただろう。

If I had come to Japan, I would have stayed in a hotel.
もし日本へ行っていたなら、ホテルに泊まっていたでしょう。
もし日本へ行っていれば、ホテルに泊まったでしょう。

のに is very commonly used with this type of conditional when the speaker is regretting. If the same person wanted to stay in a Japanese hotel for some reason but couldn't, the sentence would be:

If I had come to Japan, I would have stayed in a hotel!
もし日本へ行っていれば、ホテルに泊まったのに!

See also:

Lastly, don't use ましたでしょう. This duplication of polite forms is unnatural.

2
  • Why use たなら instead of たら? I've learned that you only use なら when it follows a noun and a na verb. Basically なら is equivalent to ば. learn-japanese-adventure.com/… Aug 28, 2023 at 1:06
  • Also I've learned that using えば/なら has a regulation where the first sentence and the second sentence cannot have the same subject if the verb in the first sentence is an action verb. So why can ば and なら be used in the sentences above? I learned that from the same link above. Aug 28, 2023 at 1:07

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .