1

Context:

今日は母とお昼ご飯にパスタを食べに行きました。帰りに私だけ駅前のカフェで下ろしてもらい、...

From this context, is it possible to tell what kind of transport/vehicle is the author using?

Is the subject of "下ろしてもらい" the driver of the vehicle which the speaker took?

1 Answer 1

3

Grammatically, the subject is 私. Most probably the vehicle is just a car (not a matter of language but of common sense).

Te-form + もらう(#7) literally means to have someone do something (as a favor). And おろす(#3) here is to drop someone (from a vehicle). So おろしてもらう means to receive the favor of being dropped off. (added) So the subject of おろす is (most probably) the mom or the driver and that of おろしてもらう is the speaker 私.

The second sentence is literally I had mom drop me off at the cafe near the station on the way back.

4
  • 2
    I suspect that when OP asked who is the "subject of 下ろしてもらい" there's a chance they meant who is the actual person doing 下ろす. So, just to make things clear, the grammatical subject of the sentence 私 and the agent of the action 下ろす are different in this sentence precisely because てもらう is used. I.e. 母は私を下ろす -> both the subject and the agent are 母, but in 母に[私は]下ろしてもらう -> the subject has shifted to 私, yet the agent is still 母, and the scene is exactly the same: Mom dropping me off.
    – jarmanso7
    Aug 12, 2023 at 1:24
  • Thank you all for your detailed explanations! Now I understand "てもらう" better, and I can see the difference between the subject of "下ろしてもらい" and the agent of "下ろす". But may I ask, everyone considers the agent of "下ろす" to be the author's mother, is this because the author used "~てもらう"? And if the author took a bus or a densha, wouldn't she use "~てもらう" for a driver?
    – Theseus
    Aug 14, 2023 at 2:45
  • 1
    @Theseus For buses or trains, おろしてもらう is not used (If the subject asked the driver for a special favor to stop at an irregular spot, then おろしてもらう may be used). So Yes to everyone considers the agent of "下ろす" to be the author's mother,; but if there are other contexts (the speaker hitchhiked or the speaker's friend picked them up, for example), interpretation can change.
    – sundowner
    Aug 14, 2023 at 8:55
  • @sundowner Thanks again! I got it.
    – Theseus
    Aug 16, 2023 at 8:52

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .