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The question is about the following part of Still for your love (video):

さぁ 裸足になって 大地けって
虹をこえて 空をつかんで

I wish 胸の十字架をにぎり 朝は
希望があなたにふりそそぎ 夜は
やわらかな光が あなたを包み込み
明日{あす}への勇気を与える

Possible translation:

I wish, clutching the cross on my chest, [that] in the morning
Hope pours into you, [and] at night
A gentle light, embracing you,
Gives you the courage to get to tomorrow.

  1. Is there any reason to read the -te forms of the first couplet as "let's" rather than imperatives? Should I perhaps link them to the "I wish"?
  2. What is that cross? Is it a crucifix, possibly? Otherwise why is whoever speaks these lines grabbing this cross while wishing (praying?)?
  3. Is the part from "asa wa" onwards the content of the wish, or are the three -i-form verbs and "ataeru" actually happening? Should "nigiri" also be referred to "you" instead of introducing the "I" into the Japanese? If so, what is "I wish" doing there?

1 Answer 1

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  1. Is there any reason to read the -te forms of the first couplet as "let's" rather than imperatives?

Basically it's up to the translator, but the interjection さあ does have a "Let's" feel to it.

  1. What is that cross? Is it a crucifix, possibly? Otherwise why is whoever speaks these lines grabbing this cross while wishing (praying?)?

It's a cross as a generic symbol of religions. It's not strictly limited to Christianity.

  1. Is the part from "asa wa" onwards the content of the wish, or are the three -i-form verbs and "ataeru" actually happening? Should "nigiri" also be referred to "you" instead of introducing the "I" into the Japanese? If so, what is "I wish" doing there?

"I wish" is just an independent sentence separated from the rest. Grammatically speaking, nothing indicates the part after "I wish" is what she wishes. From the context, however, it is reasonable to assume that "朝は...与える" is the content of her prayer.

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