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This is actually more complicated than it seems. 
The general feeling in conversation of referingreferring to oneself in the thirdpersonthird person BY GIVEN NAME(or self chosen name re:Cher, maddonaMadonna, etc) has either a childish (one who hasn't learned about the contextual nouns with which one should refer to oneself by in a given situation) or an arrogant slant to it, but again this is context based because if you are a taoistTaoist or buddistBuddhist or in an area with high prevelenceprevalence of such philosophies you might have attained Mu in which case using self referential pronouns and nouns is no longer appropriate, in this particular case you wouldn't exactly call yourself by your given name but rather say something more like 'X/Some call me NAME' but generally you would be avoiding such use and remove the nouns/pronouns that refer to the self or you as an individual (excepting maybe 'this person') since japaneseJapanese doesn't require it and that you have reached Mu would be extremely obvious from looking at you and the context would be readily apprentapparent already. Japanese is very friendly language to this kind of thinking and interaction already, and it isn't unusual to NOT refer to yourself even in formal settings, with many words satisfying the religious/philosophical requirement such as actually meaning 'an unforgivable mistake' rather than meaning 'i'I am sorry' as they are usually translated.

So to sum up: Third Person: normal with children Third Person: not unusual with young women Third Person: common and normal in highly specific context between those close to you, or when you have a particularly unique and pleasant/ironic/punny sounding name when spoken in japanese. Third Person: Standard usage if you have only one name and don't 'belong' to any class, group, or caste (ethnicity, job, etc), family, etc. (a highly specific context) Third Person: not uncommon with people with no defined identify or 'self' (both an individualist and someone who reach Mu would could readily do this), this falls into the domain 'children' as well as this is WHY children do as such, usually. Third Person: unusual and condescending/arrogant when used by masculine males or females over a certain age, the aged (but not wise), anyone entrencthed in social hierarchy speaking formally. 

  • Third Person: normal with children
  • Third Person: not unusual with young women
  • Third Person: common and normal in highly specific context between those close to you, or when you have a particularly unique and pleasant/ironic/punny sounding name when spoken in Japanese.
  • Third Person: Standard usage if you have only one name and don't 'belong' to any class, group, or caste (ethnicity, job, etc), family, etc. (a highly specific context)
  • Third Person: not uncommon with people with no defined identify or 'self' (both an individualist and someone who reach Mu would could readily do this), this falls into the domain 'children' as well as this is WHY children do as such, usually.
  • Third Person: unusual and condescending/arrogant when used by masculine males or females over a certain age, the aged (but not wise), anyone entrenched in social hierarchy speaking formally.

This was only in conversation, everyone else covered other areas thoroughly. And remeberremember there is nothing wrong with sounding arrogant, or offending people!

This is actually more complicated than it seems. The general feeling in conversation of refering to oneself in the thirdperson BY GIVEN NAME(or self chosen name re:Cher, maddona, etc) has either a childish (one who hasn't learned about the contextual nouns with which one should refer to oneself by in a given situation) or an arrogant slant to it, but again this is context based because if you are a taoist or buddist or in an area with high prevelence of such philosophies you might have attained Mu in which case using self referential pronouns and nouns is no longer appropriate, in this particular case you wouldn't exactly call yourself by your given name but rather say something more like 'X/Some call me NAME' but generally you would be avoiding such use and remove the nouns/pronouns that refer to the self or you as an individual (excepting maybe 'this person') since japanese doesn't require it and that you have reached Mu would be extremely obvious from looking at you and the context would be readily apprent already. Japanese is very friendly language to this kind of thinking and interaction already, and it isn't unusual to NOT refer to yourself even in formal settings, with many words satisfying the religious/philosophical requirement such as actually meaning 'an unforgivable mistake' rather than meaning 'i am sorry' as they are usually translated.

So to sum up: Third Person: normal with children Third Person: not unusual with young women Third Person: common and normal in highly specific context between those close to you, or when you have a particularly unique and pleasant/ironic/punny sounding name when spoken in japanese. Third Person: Standard usage if you have only one name and don't 'belong' to any class, group, or caste (ethnicity, job, etc), family, etc. (a highly specific context) Third Person: not uncommon with people with no defined identify or 'self' (both an individualist and someone who reach Mu would could readily do this), this falls into the domain 'children' as well as this is WHY children do as such, usually. Third Person: unusual and condescending/arrogant when used by masculine males or females over a certain age, the aged (but not wise), anyone entrencthed in social hierarchy speaking formally.

This was only in conversation, everyone else covered other areas thoroughly. And remeber there is nothing wrong with sounding arrogant, or offending people!

This is actually more complicated than it seems. 
The general feeling in conversation of referring to oneself in the third person BY GIVEN NAME(or self chosen name re:Cher, Madonna, etc) has either a childish (one who hasn't learned about the contextual nouns with which one should refer to oneself by in a given situation) or an arrogant slant to it, but again this is context based because if you are a Taoist or Buddhist or in an area with high prevalence of such philosophies you might have attained Mu in which case using self referential pronouns and nouns is no longer appropriate, in this particular case you wouldn't exactly call yourself by your given name but rather say something more like 'X/Some call me NAME' but generally you would be avoiding such use and remove the nouns/pronouns that refer to the self or you as an individual (excepting maybe 'this person') since Japanese doesn't require it and that you have reached Mu would be extremely obvious from looking at you and the context would be readily apparent already. Japanese is very friendly language to this kind of thinking and interaction already, and it isn't unusual to NOT refer to yourself even in formal settings, with many words satisfying the religious/philosophical requirement such as actually meaning 'an unforgivable mistake' rather than meaning 'I am sorry' as they are usually translated.

So to sum up: 

  • Third Person: normal with children
  • Third Person: not unusual with young women
  • Third Person: common and normal in highly specific context between those close to you, or when you have a particularly unique and pleasant/ironic/punny sounding name when spoken in Japanese.
  • Third Person: Standard usage if you have only one name and don't 'belong' to any class, group, or caste (ethnicity, job, etc), family, etc. (a highly specific context)
  • Third Person: not uncommon with people with no defined identify or 'self' (both an individualist and someone who reach Mu would could readily do this), this falls into the domain 'children' as well as this is WHY children do as such, usually.
  • Third Person: unusual and condescending/arrogant when used by masculine males or females over a certain age, the aged (but not wise), anyone entrenched in social hierarchy speaking formally.

This was only in conversation, everyone else covered other areas thoroughly. And remember there is nothing wrong with sounding arrogant, or offending people!

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This is actually more complicated than it seems. The general feeling in conversation of refering to oneself in the thirdperson BY GIVEN NAME(or self chosen name re:Cher, maddona, etc) has either a childish (one who hasn't learned about the contextual nouns with which one should refer to oneself by in a given situation) or an arrogant slant to it, but again this is context based because if you are a taoist or buddist or in an area with high prevelence of such philosophies you might have attained Mu in which case using self referential pronouns and nouns is no longer appropriate, in this particular case you wouldn't exactly call yourself by your given name but rather say something more like 'X/Some call me NAME' but generally you would be avoiding such use and remove the nouns/pronouns that refer to the self or you as an individual (excepting maybe 'this person') since japanese doesn't require it and that you have reached Mu would be extremely obvious from looking at you and the context would be readily apprent already. Japanese is very friendly language to this kind of thinking and interaction already, and it isn't unusual to NOT refer to yourself even in formal settings, with many words satisfying the religious/philosophical requirement such as actually meaning 'an unforgivable mistake' rather than meaning 'i am sorry' as they are usually translated.

So to sum up: Third Person: normal with children Third Person: not unusual with young women Third Person: common and normal in highly specific context between those close to you, or when you have a particularly unique and pleasant/ironic/punny sounding name when spoken in japanese. Third Person: Standard usage if you have only one name and don't 'belong' to any class, group, or caste (ethnicity, job, etc), family, etc. (a highly specific context) Third Person: not uncommon with people with no defined identify or 'self' (both an individualist and someone who reach Mu would could readily do this), this falls into the domain 'children' as well as this is WHY children do as such, usually. Third Person: unusual and condescending/arrogant when used by masculine males or females over a certain age, the aged (but not wise), anyone entrencthed in social hierarchy speaking formally.

This was only in conversation, everyone else covered other areas thoroughly. And remeber there is nothing wrong with sounding arrogant, or offending people!