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3065
bio website sakamotomaaya.com
location Dallas, TX
age 31
visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen Oct 13 '11 at 18:09

Japanese language enthusiast since 2001. Passed JLPT1 in 2008. Volunteer teacher at local study groups.


Jul
22
comment Am I coming or going? 戻ってくる vs 戻っていく
I find nothing wrong grammatically with 取りに伺います, but it should be noted that 伺う is a humble form of "visit" or "call on", and so in this particular context (a customer returning to a store), 伺う is actually contextually inappropriate. Were the context changed, however, it may be the best answer. For example, if you were picking up documents from a client of your company (and therefore required to use humble speech), 取りに伺います would be preferable to the other answers here.
Jul
22
comment Is there an equivalent to George Carlin's “Seven Dirty Words” in Japanese?
@Dave M G: I think "inherently" is the key to rintaun's statement. A word's inherent spelling or definition alone does not make it bad, but the cultural associations with that word do. Otherwise, why wouldn't words such as "excrement" be considered bad as well? What makes "excrement" safe for airing on the 6:00 news and other words not? Our culture has created these arbitrary associations, which, I feel, is what rintaun is getting at here.
Jul
22
comment What is the こと in sentences such as あなたのことが好きだ?
The contrast between generic/specific is very intriguing and something I hadn't thought about before. Thank you for your investigation into this.
Jul
22
comment What is the こと in sentences such as あなたのことが好きだ?
The explanation you give for the 事件 example makes perfect sense and seems to parallel the "depth of relationship" concept that Dave is developing.
Jul
22
comment What is the こと in sentences such as あなたのことが好きだ?
It looks like you, sawa, and Enno are all converging on the same target. The "universe of variable traits" concept is a great way to think about it. (But how am I supposed to pick a correct answer out of all this awesomeness? :)
Jul
22
comment What is the こと in sentences such as あなたのことが好きだ?
@hippietrail: Because this use of こと is preceded by の, こと is classified as a simple noun in this case, so a particle tag wouldn't fit.
Jul
21
comment What is the こと in sentences such as あなたのことが好きだ?
@Tsuyoshi: Your and sawa's comments show that with the English translation of "the Earth", 地球 refers to something physical, which sounds odd with 考える. I have changed the translation to "the planet", which is commonly used to refer to the abstract concept of our home in the universe, so I think the English now matches the idea behind the many examples in Google of 地球を考える.
Jul
21
comment What is the こと in sentences such as あなたのことが好きだ?
地球を考える can indeed sound odd if 地球 refers only to the physical substance of our planet, but 地球 can also be abstract (like 環境) in that it can refer to the concept of our home in the universe. (I pulled the example fragment from an ANA report, which had this sentence: お客様と 地球を考えて行動する ことが全日空の進むべき道と考えています。. The fragment "地球を考え" is also very common in Google.) Perhaps "the planet" is a closer English translation for this use of 地球, so I will edit my question accordingly. The rest of your answer sounds very convincing.
Jul
21
comment Redistributable Anthology of Haiku or Tanka in Electronic Form
This totally makes me want to build a hyakunin isshu flash card deck so I can dominate the next karuta bout during the New Year holiday.
Jul
21
comment What is the こと in sentences such as あなたのことが好きだ?
@Tsuyoshi: Would the difference lessen (or disappear) if 地球 was replaced with something intangible, such as 環境?
Jul
20
comment What is the proper use of だろう, is it “masculine”, and how is it different from と思 【おも】う?
Yes, I think this covers the difference better, and more completely than I suggested, since you are correct in that ~だろう can be subjective as well as objective.
Jul
20
comment What is the proper use of だろう, is it “masculine”, and how is it different from と思 【おも】う?
Excellently explained. I do wonder about your statement regarding the relative level of conviction between ~と思う and ~だろう, however. It feels to me like the former is subjective ("I think…") while the latter is more objective ("[Looking at the situation,] it's likely that…"). Could you elaborate on this particular point?
Jul
20
comment Usage of 「ごめんください」
@sawa: Rethinking this, perhaps sonkeigo is not the most accurate word. But ご免ください parallels expressions such as ご指摘ください and ご回答ください in which you request something from someone of a higher status. So with ご免ください, it would seem that, taken literally, you are requesting the privilege of being excused for your actions.
Jul
20
comment Usage of 「ごめんください」
@sawa: Is ごめんください really ungrammatical? It seems to derive from 免する, which, from what I can tell on Google, is used to mean "excuse", "exclude", or "exempt". The sonkeigo form of this verb would therefore be ご免ください and mean "Please excuse me", which is precisely how it is used in the examples here.
Jul
20
comment Are there words so bad that they aren't allowed on television?
@repecmps: I don't see how you can make the claim that "what [Dave] want[s] is bad words" when the wording of his question proves otherwise. There is no favoritism at work here. With a proper understanding of the question, it is easy to see that both answers are quite relevant.
Jul
20
comment Are there words so bad that they aren't allowed on television?
Wow, 百姓 is discriminatory? I remember learning 百姓 from a Miyazawa Kenji story. I certainly hope the long arm of censorship doesn't start erasing Miyazawa's words like in the recent kerfuffle over Twain's writing.
Jul
20
comment Are there words so bad that they aren't allowed on television?
@repecmps: While I respect (and respectfully disagree) with your opinion that this question is the same as Rolf's, I cannot personally see how they are the same. Rolf's question was simply "Give me all the 'bad words' you know" and nothing else. This question, however, touches on the existence of words which seem to be profane in some cases and innocuous in others. Rather than asking for a list of words, Dave is opening up discussion on the Japanese idea of profanity, which is one of the "finer points" of the Japanese language, as it leads to discussions of nuance and context.
Jul
20
comment Is it true that にしたって is the colloquial form of にしたところで?
@Pacerier: Yes, I think you could safely make that statement.
Jul
20
comment What is the difference between 「けれど」 and 「けれども」 and 「けど」?
@Axioplase: Ah, I missed the </not-a-real-question> tag there. My bad. :)
Jul
20
comment How do I look up this kanji?
@Pacerier: In Chrome, you have to change the global font setting to a font that uses Japanese-specific glyphs (such as Microsoft PMincho or PGothic, or Meiryo). Unlike Firefox, Chrome does not (yet) allow you to specify per-language fonts.