10,384 reputation
2760
bio website sakamotomaaya.com
location Dallas, TX
age 30
visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen Oct 13 '11 at 18:09

Japanese language enthusiast since 2001. Passed JLPT1 in 2008. Volunteer teacher at local study groups.


Aug
5
comment What are slang terms for Japanese money?
@sawa: Instead of flaming me, could you please provide a reference so I can check on this? The text we used in a Japanese history class I took in college claimed that as far as occupations went, being a merchant was not highly regarded in Tokugawa Japan, and was even treated with contempt by some. If this is incorrect, please refer me to a more accurate account. (On the other hand, if this statement is historically accurate, I fail to see how it can be "politically incorrect" and "insulting" to talk about historical fact.)
Aug
4
comment What would be the best way to express the term 'master', as in a master of some sport?
Regarding 上手: It can easily sound arrogant to use 上手 to describe yourself this way, which is why you'll hear 得意 more often. Of course 上手ではない and 上手になりたい are perfectly fine.
Aug
3
comment “You don't have to be so polite.” Really?
@sawa: I think Robusto is referring to the normal use of teineigo you would find on your average variety show.
Aug
3
comment “You don't have to be so polite.” Really?
This is highly contextual and difficult to answer as it is. Who were you talking with? Where? How politely/formally were you speaking when this comment came up?
Aug
3
comment Contrasting っぽい、らしい、みたい
Regarding っぽい, I don't think this ending alone has a nuance of inappropriateness or disapproval; it depends on context. っぽい can be used in neutral situations when the thing described has a moderate degree of some quality (good or bad).
Aug
3
comment の performing back referral? の used adjectivally?
OK, I guess I just misinterpreted you along the way somewhere. 静かなのが好き sounds good, but I still feel uncomfortable with 静かなのだったので. I can't explain exactly why. Let me think about it some more.
Aug
3
comment just by the phrase 試験を受ける, can we imply anything on the 試験?
@Dave M G: Good point. I'm sure there's no end to the list of words like this in Japanese. 及ぼす comes to mind. On the one hand, we have 影響を及ぼす, which simply means to exert an influence (good or bad), but the same verb is used in 被害を及ぼす, "inflict damage". When you think about it, it's interesting that English, even though "damage" is already negative, carries that negative connotation into the verb as well.
Aug
2
comment The difference between くらい and ほど in hyperbole
I think you're comparing ほど to the wrong use of くらい here. For instance, 「この川は、向こう岸が見えないくらい広い。」 or 「びっくりするくらいきれいに撮れた。」. Both ほど and くらい work here, and they both mean "B to the extent that A" or "B is/was sufficient to cause A".
Aug
2
comment The difference between くらい and ほど in hyperbole
The hyperbole aspect of this question was not covered in the answers to the other question.
Aug
2
comment Contrasting っぽい、らしい、みたい
Don't forget that らしい has the additional meaning of "embodying the typical or proper characteristics of", and I think that's what's meant here. 女らしい = womanly; 男らしい = manly; 女の子らしい = girlish. With っぽい, you're on mostly the right track. The English "-ish" often conveys the same meaning, even if it doesn't fit with every word. オレンジっぽい = orange-ish; 大人っぽい = adult-like; 夏っぽい = with a summer-y feeling.
Aug
2
comment の performing back referral? の used adjectivally?
静かなのだったので isn't quite the same as the の your first examples. The の in 名詞文 ("A is equivalent to B") elides the repeated noun, as you noted, but it doesn't have this function in 形容詞文 ("A has the quality B"). 静かなのだった therefore falls under the ~のだ pattern, and since adding a further ので to this would be redundant, 静かだったので is better.
Aug
1
comment Transitive/Intransitive + にくい (and +られる)
For example, 燃えにくい, 混ざりにくい, and (雪が)降りにくい can all be tested empirically: try burning it or mixing it yourself, or check the archives of weather records. Or with 「この寒さでは雪も溶けにくいだろう。」, you're making a judgment based on objective knowledge (specifically, the knowledge that snow won't melt when it's really cold). 「この問題は解けにくい。」, however, because it is talking about whether the problem will resolve itself without intervention, you would have to know the future, which cannot be stated objectively or tested empirically.
Aug
1
comment Transitive/Intransitive + にくい (and +られる)
IMEs often have non-standard conversions, which can be confusing in cases like this, since ~にくい and ~がたい aren't equivalent. It's probably best to use hiragana here. Back on topic, I've found many "neutral" examples of ~にくい with 無意思自動詞, such as 「水と油は混ざりにくい。」 or 「この地方は冬にも雪が降りにくい。」. Neither of these necessarily imply that the speaker considers the actions (混ざる, 降る) undesirable. (In fact, if you were making a vinaigrette, 混ざる would be very desirable.) Now I'm wondering if it has more to do with whether the quality marked by ~にくい can be empirically or objectively tested.
Aug
1
comment Transitive/Intransitive + にくい (and +られる)
OK, I think we're getting much closer with your edit. The idea of the desirability of the result definitely seems to factor into the distinction. By the way, is there any particular reason you're using ~難い for ~にくい? I've only seen the kanjified ~難い used when ~がたい is meant (such as in 有り難う).
Aug
1
comment Transitive/Intransitive + にくい (and +られる)
The reasoning you have here for (1) was shot down by Matt's example of 割れにくい: an external force is still implied with 割れる, just as it is with ほどける or とける (or 壊れる, to add another example). The premise that "問題が解ける means that the problem is solved by someone" is also false; a problem could be resolved without human intervention simply by a natural course of events. I think this question runs deeper than what you have here.
Jul
31
comment What is the こと in sentences such as あなたのことが好きだ?
@Pacerier: No, because in this use it's not being attached to a noun, but standing on its own.
Jul
30
comment “Unsolvable problem”
@Flaw: Starting a new question is definitely the way to go. I'm very curious to see if we can come up with a good answer for this ~にくい conundrum.
Jul
30
comment How do I decide when to use plain or past verb form?
@Axioplase: In Japanese, 行く encompasses only the action of going from point A to point B. Therefore it ends once you have arrived at point B, not once you have returned from B back to A. To say that you will do something after you have gone to and returned from Japan, you can use 日本に行ってきたとき or 日本から帰ったとき. Another interesting one is the ~ている form of 行く: 彼は日本に行っている does not mean "he is going (on the way) to Japan", but "he has gone to Japan [and is still there]" (or in other words, "he went to Japan, and the state expressed by that action still continues").
Jul
29
comment “Unsolvable problem”
@Matt: That's a good counterexample; back to the drawing board, I guess. :) This is definitely a puzzler.
Jul
29
comment What is the こと in sentences such as あなたのことが好きだ?
The "focusing" aspect of こと comes through better with your 見下す example than with 好き, I think. Especially with a verb that has a variable degree of focus, such as the simple 見る: 私のことを見る definitely feels like it has more focus (and also extends into the abstract) than 私を見る.