10,464 reputation
2559
bio website sakamotomaaya.com
location Dallas, TX
age 30
visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen Oct 13 '11 at 18:09

Japanese language enthusiast since 2001. Passed JLPT1 in 2008. Volunteer teacher at local study groups.


Aug
18
comment Usage and meaning of [passive verb]-てみれば
@sawa: I think you are confusing "see" in the physical sense (as in light hitting the retina) with "see" in the mental sense (as in observing a course of events). 見る is used for the former, and みる is used for the latter.
Aug
18
comment ことができる versus V~える form
This fits very well with the answer I was thinking of writing. I think the difference shows up even more clearly with the negatives, which you touched on a bit. 食べることができない: I am physically incapable of eating; there is something (such as a medical condition or apparatus) preventing me from eating. 食べられない: I am physically capable of eating, but for other reasons (food preferences, religious reasons, time constraints) I cannot eat.
Aug
18
comment How do you classify a word like “電子レンジ”?
Actually, "gas range" is perfectly valid in English. Both "range" and "stove" are used to refer to the same thing. There is probably a regional differentiation, much in the way people from different areas use "soda", "pop", and "coke" to refer to fizzy drinks. So ガスレンジ probably came directly from "gas range" and ストーブ got used to refer to a gas-powered space heater. The interesting bit in this question is why 電子レンジ is 電子レンジ and not something else, like エレキレンジ (a la エレキギター).
Aug
17
comment Using な in positive instead of negative imperative (e.g. 行きな)
Related: Meaning of …立てちゃいなよ
Aug
15
comment When to use 欲しがる instead of 欲しい
@Pacerier: That would work. (Although ほしい is "want", so you might say something like さっき、動物が好きと言っていたから or さっき、猫が飼いたいと言っていたから.) But using と言う after ほしい or ~たい means you can use it in reference to either a second or third person (see examples in answer), so the rules about ~がる don't apply.
Aug
15
comment What is the difference between 言うな! and 言ってんじゃねぇぞ?
Related: How rude is it to say 寝ぼけてるんじゃねぇよ!
Aug
14
comment When to use 欲しがる instead of 欲しい
@Pacerier: First, why are you telling someone what he likes? He should already know that… :) Both ~ほしい and ~たい can be used with the second person. The rule is that you generally don't use these direct expressions with someone of a higher status. But if you're on equal footing (i.e. in a situation where you don't have to use teineigo), you can say things like 「公園に行きたい?」 or 「誕生日にプレゼントをもらうとしたら、何がほしい?」.
Aug
14
comment Fun with synonyms - “evaluation/investigation/etc.”
探査 is used in 宇宙探査機, "spacecraft". It's used to mean "explore" or "probe" most often.
Aug
11
comment Is じゃないです equally correct as じゃありません?
@rintaun: I find that odd, because the raw feeling I get from the sum of the Japanese speech I have heard is consistently on the side of ~ません asserting the negation more than ~ないです. Maybe there's a dialectical variation going on beneath the surface…?
Aug
10
comment Is じゃないです equally correct as じゃありません?
@Tsuyoshi Ito: Quite true. I will edit to emphasize this point.
Aug
9
comment What changes are made to the pronunciation of gairaigo?
@Tsuyoshi: You mean "kuh-RAH-tee"? :) That sounds so wrong, and I hate it, but how does one go about changing the bad pronunciation of millions of people? (Plus in the U.S., there's a subliminal rule which says that if you pronounce "karate" as からて, suddenly you're the stuck-up aficionado who thumbs his nose at the poor commoners who don't know the correct pronunciation.)
Aug
9
comment Expression equivalent to “as far/long/much as I/you X”
@Lukman: なるべく早く is another option. (The difference was addressed here.)
Aug
9
comment When to use 欲しがる instead of 欲しい
@Mark Hosang: In that case you could replace 生徒に in the above example with 私に: 先生は私に野菜を食べて欲しいんですか。 (using ん if you suspect your teacher wants you to eat the vegetables but hasn't said so directly). This would get the meaning across, but it might not be the best sentence for the situation. What was the conversation like up to this point?
Aug
8
comment What is the learning curve for learning Japanese writing?
@Andrew Grimm: I'm afraid not. :) But it's way awesome when you finish your first novel of that sort and set it on the shelf so you can show it to people and say, "See that book? I read that." It's akin to the feeling of accomplishment you get from reading Hamlet in the original Klingon.
Aug
8
comment When to use 欲しがる instead of 欲しい
@istrasci: Without context we can't be sure, but the example sentence you mention most likely came from a book of some sort. Authors can break rules such as 欲しい/欲しがる because, after all, they have every right to step into the minds of their characters. I mentioned this in an answer to a question about ~げ, which has a function similar to ~がる.
Aug
8
comment Why is it 日本語がわかります instead of 日本語をわかります?
I was about to edit your answer, but I was unsure whether this would create a conflict between the example sentences and your "double-ga predicate" conclusion.
Aug
8
comment Why is it 日本語がわかります instead of 日本語をわかります?
The first が in your example sentences should probably be は. As they are, they place extra focus on the subject. For example, 猫が魚が好きだ, which could be reordered as 魚が好きなのは猫だ, answers the question, "What likes fish?" ("Cats like fish."). At the point when you answer the question, "like fish" is old information, and so it follows the subject が (as in your example) or precedes the topic は (as in the reordered version). To express, without preceding context, the general truth that cats like fish, 猫は魚が好きだ is best. The same applies to the other example sentences.
Aug
5
comment What are slang terms for Japanese money?
Well I wish I could figure out what sawa's trying to say (seeing as he was the one who brought up the word 士農工商), but apparently my foreign barbarian ears are not to be privy to such highly guarded secrets… sigh
Aug
5
comment What is the phrase for “getting to know” someone or something?
I'm wondering if we could brainstorm some example sentences to improve this answer.
Aug
5
comment What are slang terms for Japanese money?
@sawa: I have edited my answer to clarify my original statement, based on texts available in my library. I have also politely requested that you provide references to support your claims, but have received nothing. I am genuinely interested in learning whether I am incorrect, but having you say "You're wrong, I'm right, so there" is not helping me.