10,424 reputation
2559
bio website sakamotomaaya.com
location Dallas, TX
age 30
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen Oct 13 '11 at 18:09

Japanese language enthusiast since 2001. Passed JLPT1 in 2008. Volunteer teacher at local study groups.


Jun
2
comment Is it ok to use ~て下さりました instead of ~ていただきました?
"[...] くれる is only used when the giver is the third person [...]" This doesn't sound right, as I can directly thank someone for doing a favor for me, such as with 先日、手伝ってくれてありがとう。 (The diagram you supplied confirms this is valid.) Could you clarify?
Jun
2
answered What are the differences between 〜ので and 〜から?
Jun
2
comment Is the grammar of 心の冷たい人 idiomatic?
@syockit: The difference between が and の here is extremely slight and probably not worth worrying about, but if you get into the grammatical nuts and bolts of it, が puts the emphasis on the fact that the person's back is tall (as opposed to, say, his nose). 背の高い is a mere statement of fact. Of course in everyday situations, splitting hairs this finely is of little practical use. :)
Jun
2
comment Fun with synonyms - “to grab/catch/capture”
@syockit: 捕らえる and 捉える differ in that 捕らえる usually refers to physically capturing something, while 捉える refers to "mentally" capturing something (a concept). I usually see the latter, but this probably has more to do with my choice of reading material more than which is actually more common.
Jun
2
comment What's the difference between ようこそ and いらしゃいませ?
@Ken: But if "public" simply means "a place anyone can enter", why wouldn't the local supermarket or family restaurant use ようこそ instead of いらっしゃいませ? I understand how the distinction between public/private works in some cases, but thinking about it in terms of area, as I stated, leads to far fewer exceptions. Please let me know if I'm misinterpreting your reasoning.
Jun
2
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
1
comment What's the difference between ようこそ and いらしゃいませ?
@Ken: I have to respectfully disagree with you here, as I can find plenty of examples where ようこそ is used by a private establishment (such as a shopping mall or theme park). And as repecmps mentioned, you can welcome someone into your home (for the first time) with ようこそ.
Jun
1
comment Passive-transitive-verb vs. Intransitive-verb (他動詞の受け身 vs. 自動詞)
After pondering this for a bit, I'm thinking this has something to do with the presence of intent in the action. To use your example, 教えられる shows that the action of teaching was intentional, whereas 教わる merely shows that something was learned, whether the teaching was intentional or not. Similarly, 直る (to get better without intervention) and 直される (to be repaired by someone intentionally). Unfortunately I don't have enough verification to merit posting an answer. Can someone tell me if I'm on the right track?
Jun
1
answered What's the difference between ようこそ and いらしゃいませ?
Jun
1
comment Fun with synonyms - “to grab/catch/capture”
@sartak: Good example. I think (but I would need to do some more research to be sure) that the difference between 捕まえる and 捕る boils down to whether the thing to be captured is actively trying to avoid being captured (if it is, then 捕まえる is more natural).
Jun
1
answered Fun with synonyms - “to grab/catch/capture”
Jun
1
awarded  Commentator
Jun
1
comment What is the difference between these four forms of “to do”?
@repecmps: Thank you for your comment. I am aware of the additional definitions of やる which you kindly pointed out, but in my comment I was specifically referring to the combination of やる with Chinese-derived words. While 宿題やった may not be "grammatically correct", it is allowable in an appropriate (casual) setting. Finally, 電話する may in fact include the particle を to become 電話をする. To verify this, simply search Google for the phrase "電話をする" (including the quotes). These forms are identical in meaning and acceptable for use anywhere.
Jun
1
comment Is the grammar of 心の冷たい人 idiomatic?
For "The tall person over there...", you might use あそこの背の高い人は(...). Putting this before the は particle means your main point is not that the person is tall, but that what you want to say is limited to the scope of "the tall person over there". If, however, your point is that the person is tall, it would follow the は particle: あそこ(の/にいる)人は背が(すごく)高いです。
Jun
1
comment What is the difference between these four forms of “to do”?
Ah, but 宿題をやる and 掃除をやる are perfectly valid constructions, so it's not always the case that やる can't replace する with 漢語. (And in more informal settings, the を is dropped, such as in 宿題やった?) (But 電話(を)やる certainly sounds odd; the line dictating when you can switch out one for the other is a fuzzy one.)
Jun
1
awarded  Mortarboard
Jun
1
comment Usage of すみません (sumimasen) versus ごめんなさい (gomen'nasai)
@Robusto: An excellent point. Knowing the actual definition of the word definitely enlightens one as to the Japanese view of gratitude and apology.
Jun
1
answered Is the grammar of 心の冷たい人 idiomatic?
Jun
1
awarded  Editor
Jun
1
revised Usage of すみません (sumimasen) versus ごめんなさい (gomen'nasai)
added more phrases