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bio website sakamotomaaya.com
location Dallas, TX
age 31
visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen Oct 13 '11 at 18:09

Japanese language enthusiast since 2001. Passed JLPT1 in 2008. Volunteer teacher at local study groups.


Jun
2
comment Can somebody explain the various words and combinations thereof used for thanking?
Personally, I would put どうも and ありがとう on the same level (Casual) and どうもありがとう and ありがとうございます on the same level (Polite), but this is an excellent summary.
Jun
2
answered Is there a rule for when to use くらい vs ぐらい?
Jun
2
answered Using 「なるほど」 {naruhodo} and 「やっぱり」 {yappari} in the same situation
Jun
2
comment Is it ok to use ~て下さりました instead of ~ていただきました?
Ah, you're absolutely right. I apologize for not reading as closely as I should have been.
Jun
2
comment ありがとうございます vs. ありがとうございました
That's an interesting hypothesis. I can't detect this connotation, but then again, I'm not a native speaker. All I know is that I've heard both from store clerks, so they seem to be easily interchangeable in those cases.
Jun
2
answered Which verbs have 辞書形 (dictionary forms) that look like ~ます conjugations?
Jun
2
comment About 「同じ」 {onaji} and 「同じく」 {onajiku}
@YOU: 新た (あらた) and 改めて (あらためて)? These are different parts of speech. 新た is a standard な-adjective, and 改めて comes from the verb 改める.
Jun
2
comment ありがとうございます vs. ありがとうございました
This page at ALC backs up your answer. In short, ありがとうございます is for actions which have not been completed yet or were just now completed, while ありがとうございました is for actions that were completed in the past. (But this is not a hard-and-fast rule, as evidenced by store clerks who will use ありがとうございました immediately after you have concluded your purchase.)
Jun
2
comment Difference between 重い and 重たい
And さびしい/さみしい as well. 重たい is typically negative, as repecmps mentioned, and used with abstract (think "emotionally weighty") things more often than 重い.
Jun
2
comment Is it ok to use ~て下さりました instead of ~ていただきました?
"[...] くれる is only used when the giver is the third person [...]" This doesn't sound right, as I can directly thank someone for doing a favor for me, such as with 先日、手伝ってくれてありがとう。 (The diagram you supplied confirms this is valid.) Could you clarify?
Jun
2
answered What are the differences between 〜ので and 〜から?
Jun
2
comment Is the grammar of 心の冷たい人 idiomatic?
@syockit: The difference between が and の here is extremely slight and probably not worth worrying about, but if you get into the grammatical nuts and bolts of it, が puts the emphasis on the fact that the person's back is tall (as opposed to, say, his nose). 背の高い is a mere statement of fact. Of course in everyday situations, splitting hairs this finely is of little practical use. :)
Jun
2
comment Fun with synonyms - “to grab/catch/capture”
@syockit: 捕らえる and 捉える differ in that 捕らえる usually refers to physically capturing something, while 捉える refers to "mentally" capturing something (a concept). I usually see the latter, but this probably has more to do with my choice of reading material more than which is actually more common.
Jun
2
comment What's the difference between ようこそ and いらしゃいませ?
@Ken: But if "public" simply means "a place anyone can enter", why wouldn't the local supermarket or family restaurant use ようこそ instead of いらっしゃいませ? I understand how the distinction between public/private works in some cases, but thinking about it in terms of area, as I stated, leads to far fewer exceptions. Please let me know if I'm misinterpreting your reasoning.
Jun
2
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
1
comment What's the difference between ようこそ and いらしゃいませ?
@Ken: I have to respectfully disagree with you here, as I can find plenty of examples where ようこそ is used by a private establishment (such as a shopping mall or theme park). And as repecmps mentioned, you can welcome someone into your home (for the first time) with ようこそ.
Jun
1
comment Passive-transitive-verb vs. Intransitive-verb (他動詞の受け身 vs. 自動詞)
After pondering this for a bit, I'm thinking this has something to do with the presence of intent in the action. To use your example, 教えられる shows that the action of teaching was intentional, whereas 教わる merely shows that something was learned, whether the teaching was intentional or not. Similarly, 直る (to get better without intervention) and 直される (to be repaired by someone intentionally). Unfortunately I don't have enough verification to merit posting an answer. Can someone tell me if I'm on the right track?
Jun
1
answered What's the difference between ようこそ and いらしゃいませ?
Jun
1
comment Fun with synonyms - “to grab/catch/capture”
@sartak: Good example. I think (but I would need to do some more research to be sure) that the difference between 捕まえる and 捕る boils down to whether the thing to be captured is actively trying to avoid being captured (if it is, then 捕まえる is more natural).
Jun
1
answered Fun with synonyms - “to grab/catch/capture”