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Jun
3
comment Use of ~のか (~んですか) in questions not seeking a yes/no answer
That's an interesting hypothesis. I'm still not sure I agree with you on ~んです, but what I'm most interested in finding out with this question is the function of ~んですか. I would certainly welcome further details and/or examples for that specific part of your answer.
Jun
3
comment Is there a general counter word for objects that you can fallback on if you're not sure which one to use?
@Tsuyoshi: Ah, so I guess this is a case of my non-native ears getting in the way again. :)
Jun
3
comment Use of ~のか (~んですか) in questions not seeking a yes/no answer
Thank you for your answer. I don't agree that んです acknowledges that the person you're talking to already knows the information. (I have my own slew of thoughts on the ~のだ construction, but that's best left for another question.) Regarding "is it that", I'm not quite sure I follow you. If you want to place focus on the interrogative word (which is what "is it that" seems to do), would it not sound more natural to say 「着いたのはいつですか。」?
Jun
3
comment Is there a general counter word for objects that you can fallback on if you're not sure which one to use?
In my experience, 個 tends to be limited to tangible objects, like helmets or fruit. Is there a general counter for abstract things, such as in the sentence: "14 proposals were presented."? Counting 提案 with 個 sounds a little strange to my ears.
Jun
3
revised Why are some lyrics' words written in kanji whose usual reading is not how it is sung?
Oops; あす is the day after today, not the day after tomorrow.
Jun
3
revised Use of ~のか (~んですか) in questions not seeking a yes/no answer
Retagged.
Jun
3
comment Use of ~のか (~んですか) in questions not seeking a yes/no answer
This is off-topic, but I should point out that 食べたの? is not strictly feminine. In yes/no questions, the の often indicates that the asker has reason to believe the answer is yes. For instance, in response to hearing someone say 「大変!窓が…!」, 「割れたの?」 is gender-neutral. The の shows that the asker has surmised, based on the first line, that the likely cause for 「大変!」 is that the window is broken. Without the の, no hint as to what the asker suspects is provided. But I don't see how this transfers (if it does) to non-yes/no questions, which is why I'd like to stick to those.
Jun
3
awarded  Student
Jun
3
comment 「~たじゃない」 expression in spoken Japanese
@YOU: I don't believe it is. I regularly hear things such as いいじゃん across a wide variety of speakers.
Jun
3
asked Use of ~のか (~んですか) in questions not seeking a yes/no answer
Jun
3
comment 「~たじゃない」 expression in spoken Japanese
This is about as spot-on as you can get. The only thing I would add is that じゃない is sometimes shortened to じゃん in very informal contexts.
Jun
3
answered Is there a difference between この小さな街で and 小さなこの街で?
Jun
3
revised Using なるほど (naruhodo) and やっぱり (yappari) in the same situation
Responded to updated question.
Jun
2
comment What's the difference between ね and な as tag questions?
Can you clarify what you mean by な adding "emotional emphasis" to a sentence? If we consider the examples of 明日は無理だ。 and 明日は無理だな。, the な actually seems to subtract from the emphasis and make the sentence a bit softer.
Jun
2
awarded  Autobiographer
Jun
2
comment What are the differences between 〜ので and 〜から?
@istraci: It's also good to note that ~ので is only a part of the base ~のだ construction, which has a much broader functional scope than ~から. I have put down some thoughts on this here.
Jun
2
comment What are the differences between 〜ので and 〜から?
@istraci: The table on the second page of this PDF notes that ~ので is used for factual actions and situations, and that when it is used to express the speaker's volition, it softens the statement and makes it more polite (less insistent). On the line below, ~から is described as giving the speaker's intent or thought. ~のだから is a slightly different animal, and according to this (PDF), it shows an indirect connection between cause and effect.
Jun
2
comment Can somebody explain the various words and combinations thereof used for thanking?
And on that line of thought, we mustn't forget the straight-up 感謝します (かんしゃします).
Jun
2
comment Is there a rule for when to use くらい vs ぐらい?
@Lukman: どれ and どの are noun and modifier, respectively. For example, どれがいい? vs. どのケーキがいい? :)
Jun
2
comment Can somebody explain the various words and combinations thereof used for thanking?
+1 for including the slang あざーっす.