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Jul
30
comment When grandmas tell their kids お天道様がみてるよ, how do the kids know who お天道様 is?
@Avery Haha! That would make things simple! No, sorry, what I meant was one of those things that you know what it means, but you can't explain why it means it. So, you know that お天道様 is watching you, and that's a good thing, even if you don't know exactly who or what お天道様 is.
Jul
29
comment When grandmas tell their kids お天道様がみてるよ, how do the kids know who お天道様 is?
It might be just one of those things you know but don't understand...
Jul
22
comment Is the difference between On and Kun readings greater than just the pronunciation of the character?
Yes, I think it would be prudent to point out that almost every rule has it's exceptions :)
Jul
22
comment Is the difference between On and Kun readings greater than just the pronunciation of the character?
@Aerovistae: I edited it to say what they mean (smart, clever). It's not a perfect example, because they're slightly different parts of speech (the former is an i-adj, the latter a na-adj). And yes, that's pretty much what I'm saying :) That said, my advice would be to only worry about learning one way of saying something when you first start out (I would suggest the Kun-reading as they tend to have broader meanings). An English learner doesn't need to know "smart" "wise" "clever" "intelligent" "quick-witted" and so on and so forth, just to get their point across :)
Jul
22
comment What is the grammar form with “にした” in this sentence?
Can you explain why you think your first bullet point is stupid?
Jul
22
comment Is the difference between On and Kun readings greater than just the pronunciation of the character?
@Aerovistae: That's correct, for any given word there is generally one reading for it, you can't really change that around (there are, of course, exceptions). What changes is where you might use kanji that use they On-yomi. You won't see a government building's name have any Okurigana. Secondly, that was my point about "smart" and "intelligent". For all intents and purposes, they mean the same thing, but a native English speaker would probably hear the (subtle) difference between "She's really smart" and "She's really intelligent". It's a matter of word choice and nuance, not general meaning.
Jul
21
comment When does こいつ refer to a situation?
@Dave: I hesitated to take out the middle of the sentence. I didn't want to confuse people and also didn't want to add extraneous information that would also confuse the question. In the dots are "....「まずい」がよくないという意味であることに....". And I also thought that about it still having to do with people in the end.
Jul
16
comment How to translate standalone noun + a ます verb (in a heading)
@taylor: Thanks for your input :) I feel like the reason some people found this answer lacking was because it's a little more anecdotal than definitive. I can't say for sure the linguistics behind this construction, but I thought I'd give my understanding of it.
Jul
14
comment How do I “understand” kaomoji? (Japanese smilies)
Bookmarked! Thank you so much \(T∇T)/
Jul
14
comment Why is the Japanese government considering adding kanji such as “cancer” to the jinmeiyō kanji?
I thought that the names list was made from seeing what people where actually using in names. Is that part of what your question is? I hope no one names their child "corpse"...
Jun
28
comment Why is 「人口」 used to denote population?
I always wondered this too :)
Jun
26
comment は as sentence final particle
@gibbon, neither did I, it was something I just learned from hearing people use it :)
Jun
25
comment Switch between transitives and intransitives
@Gradius: I 100% agree.
Jun
25
comment Switch between transitives and intransitives
@sawa, two things: One, what is a "Google fundamentalist"? I think I know what you're trying to say, but I don't think you said it how you meant it. Secondly, I'm not sure if English is your first language, but saying "the user in question" comes off as quite rude in this context. It's implies (at least to me) that his fault is so awful that you can't even speak his name (or write out his pseudonym as the case may be). I'm going to give you the benefit of the doubt and assume you didn't mean it that way.
Jun
22
comment How to translate standalone noun + a ます verb (in a heading)
If this isn't right, can someone correct me, instead of just donwvoting. Much more helpful that way.
Jun
21
comment For how long has Japanese been the official language of Japan?
@DaveMG Oh, I'm sorry, I changed the title before I read your comment, now I feel like a jerk :( Just every time I read it seems so sarcastic, it takes me a while to realize that olchauvin is asking a legitimate question...
Jun
20
comment How is this もって used?
@Gradius, yeah those were poor translations, I was more trying to nail down the actual meaning. I'll take it you think it's the former meaning [1]?
Jun
20
comment Why is the Japanese currency pronounced “yen” in English?
@sawa: Wouldn't it be a cultural bias if he asked "why isn't ¥ used more often", because we use $ so much in English? "Why don't they do it like us?" is a cultural bias, not "Why do they copy our methods?".
Jun
20
comment Why is the Japanese currency pronounced “yen” in English?
@sawa: I disagree...I don't think this is much different then asking for readings on a kanji. Also, I think this is a question a lot of beginners (and above) would have. I know I went a while (probably longer than I should have) thinking that "en" was used in some occasions, but there must be an occasion that it was read "yen" and I just hadn't learned it...
Jun
16
comment Can the suffix -人 be used to express heritage?
@DaveMG: Cheers :)