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location Beijing, China
age 32
visits member for 3 years
seen Oct 11 at 9:57

A Chinese PhD student in Tsinghua, and English is my second language, and Japanese is my third language. (I don't know which one is better now ...)

I learned Japanese by myself in China (long) before I stayed in Ishikawa, Japan for almost a year. As I didn't take any classes, there are a lot grammar concepts I cannot explain in detail.

My method of learning a foreign language is through using it (including English, though we have English classes in school). Also, I would check the grammar books and dictionaries, but what I want to see most is examples. In China I'm only able to read and listen to Japanese, while I can only speak to myself. I got my chance to speak Japanese when I was in Japan. I'm also keeping a Japanese diary now (I won't make it public).

IMO, to learn a language you are trying to know how the language is used by natives. Grammar books and dictionaries are very important, but they get out of date easily, as language itself is evolving. Also, they don't cover every aspects of the language.

In language study, most times there is not a reason why a usage is correct. It is correct just because the natives use it in that way. Rules can be summarized into grammar, but there are always exceptions for grammar rules. So when a weird thing is found to be correct, just memorize it.

I always prefer to read grammar books or dictionaries that are written by natives and for natives. The versions written for foreigners often get simplified to cover only a small portion. Also different languages are so different that you are not able explain one language in another.


Dec
15
revised Can a Japanese person understand something written in traditional Chinese
added 567 characters in body
Dec
15
comment Can a Japanese person understand something written in traditional Chinese
@ZhenLin I couldn't quite make a difference of the two. Thank you.
Dec
15
answered Sentence ending に and のに compared to their non-sentence-ending form
Dec
15
comment Can a Japanese person understand something written in traditional Chinese
We also learn that in China, but that does not change that it is still hard to understand, and also hard to write.
Dec
15
comment Can a Japanese person understand something written in traditional Chinese
[Previous comment deleted an rewritten here] In traditional Chinese, 的 is not used as の. A search in the dictionary came back with some results for 勉强 zdic.net/cd/ci/9/ZdicE5Zdic8BZdic8952017.htm , which shows that the meaning of 勉强 in the past in Chinese has a little similarity to the meaning in modern Japanese.
Dec
15
revised Can a Japanese person understand something written in traditional Chinese
added 26 characters in body
Dec
15
answered Can a Japanese person understand something written in traditional Chinese
Dec
14
awarded  Analytical
Dec
14
revised What is the correct way to say: “where are you going?”
added 700 characters in body
Dec
14
answered What is the correct way to say: “where are you going?”
Dec
14
revised How to use とりあえず in sentences
added 190 characters in body
Dec
14
answered Making sense out of Japanese proverbs
Dec
14
awarded  Commentator
Dec
14
comment Why are there 3 ways of writing in Japanese?
As to identifying word boundaries, sure the mixture of scripts helps, but I don't think that contributes why different forms exist. As the introduce of "常用漢字", a lot of word now take the form of mixed Kanji and Kana, and a lot of word would only use Kana. Kanji can be used to distinguish different meaning, e.g. 書く and 描く are different. And for Chinese, automatic word segmentation is still a challenging research topic. It is even hard to define what is a word in Chinese.
Dec
14
comment Politeness in examination questions
Never seen any school examination questions. A wild guess may be that for children, they use what they use to avoid giving they a bad habit; in universities, the words would take a form in technical papers, which only introduce the facts.
Dec
13
comment Usage and reading of the Ampersand
I doubt if "&" has become part of the Japanese language. It may be merely a misc symbol. The reading would depend on the specific situation when it is used (if it is indeed used). And the way how it is used may depend on the user (I suspect that most people won't use this symbol in everyday life).
Dec
13
comment Usage and reading of the Ampersand
Can you give some real Japanese examples? This ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/… does not mention any use in Japanese language.
Dec
13
answered The different usages of ことがある
Dec
13
comment How to use から and だから as conjunctions?
い-adjectives are not 形容動詞, but 形容詞.
Dec
12
answered How to use とりあえず in sentences