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Dec
7
comment Noun+とばかりに mean?
Sure, but it will hinder the understanding of とばかりに, because a natural translation for this is so far removed from the original construct. 「デザートとばかりにケーキ類も全滅させた」→ wipe out all the cakes for dessert
Dec
5
comment Understanding 「海外ではプロゲーマも人気職業の一つなの。」
As it stands, this is a list of seven good questions unrelated to each other. This makes it very hard for people to write and assess answers, nevermind find and reference them in the future. I think it would benefit everyone if you could post separate questions for each topic :)
Dec
5
comment Use of かける (N5 question)
@rhyaeris Yes, but only when used in a noun phrase (e.g. [something]を着た[somebody]). So you can say コートを着た背の高いのが私です to mean “The tall one wearing a coat is me”, but 私はコートを着た will mean “I wore a coat” and not “I'm wearing a coat”.
Dec
5
comment Use of かける (N5 question)
@Derpius I agree, it is grammatical and totally makes sense in some situations, as is the case with choice #2.
Dec
2
comment Help understanding 腸捻転エビ固めモミ手返し
Is this a wife whose husband was pleading/apologizing about something but then did something to betray that? If not, a little more context would help.
Nov
29
comment Is it ever right to use ば conditional to mean 'when'?
@Derpius Not necessarily. It can sound a bit over-dramatic though, if it doesn't match the tone of the overall text.
Nov
28
comment “事故にでもあったのではあるまいか。” grammar help please?
Yes, that's right :)
Nov
27
comment “事故にでもあったのではあるまいか。” grammar help please?
Does this answer your question? japanese.stackexchange.com/questions/21519/…
Nov
25
comment Why is に used in 若者が元気に溢れている?
@Splikie That's true. I'm not so sure anymore! If my answer is terribly off-base, hopefully someone will point it out or post a better answer…
Nov
25
comment Why is に used in 若者が元気に溢れている?
@Splikie Sorry, I made a huge mistake about the usage. I meant subject, not direct object.
Nov
25
comment Why is に used in 若者が元気に溢れている?
@Splikie Those are good questions, but unfortunately I think they require explanations that are too long for a comment. The 隠れ蓑 example is pretty interesting. You might want to post them as separate questions :)
Nov
24
comment Why does the sentence combination 「situation。 explanation から。」sound awkward?
@l'électeur ありがとうございます。こちらこそすみません、京都人への個人的な恐怖心からくる被害妄想でした。方言ひとつでここまでビビるなんて。いつも手探りで書いてるだけなので、‌​何か間違った点があればどんどん指摘してくださいね。
Nov
24
comment What's the difference between あれ and 彼女?
@Jaime Yes, that seems possible. Hopefully it doesn't happen so much nowadays.
Nov
24
comment Why does the sentence combination 「situation。 explanation から。」sound awkward?
@l'électeur 京都弁なのもあって皮肉られてるのか褒められてるのか本気でわかりません……
Nov
23
comment Is た形 required when using 自動詞 as an adjective?
@DariusJahandarie At least to me, it retains the “became [verb]-ed” sense as in 話がこじれた. But then again, 優れた and also ありふれた/ばかげた as in Derpius's answer feels very much like a plain adjective (“excellent student” and not “student who excelled”), so I came to realize my answer is a little simplistic. It probably has to do with lexical aspect — I hope someone more knowledgeable than me will chime in.
Nov
22
comment Questions about 「とは」and 「思わなんだ」
Possible duplicate of Why is the topic marker often used in negative statements (ではない, ~とは思わない)?
Nov
21
comment 「」 don't seem to be 'quotation marks' in news article titles, what do they mean?
@Splikie You're right, headlines have a particular grammar, but hopefully most of the ones you encounter will be written a little better. Omitting particles shouldn't come at the expense of clarity. It takes getting used to though. Good luck!
Nov
20
comment What does なんです mean in this sentence?
Also: japanese.stackexchange.com/questions/14565/usage-of-nan-desu
Nov
20
comment For what purposes is たろう used?
Don't worry, your translation of the sentence is correct. For example, 善人たろうと決める = 善人であろうと決める (decide to be a good person)
Nov
20
comment For what purposes is たろう used?
Unfortunately, the 〜たろう in that sentence is not an example of the dictionary entry you quoted. Rather, it's the volitional form of 〜たる (助動), which is more like the equivalent of 〜である/であろう. Your two questions are still valid though, independent of this fact.