888 reputation
48
bio website overpunch.com
location Sydney, Australia
age 27
visits member for 2 years, 5 months
seen 13 hours ago

I am a computational linguistics PhD candidate. But before that, long before that, I fell in love with languages.

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Nov
22
comment Are there any common grammatical errors made by native Japanese speakers?
That point about 申し訳ない is interesting. So is 申し訳ありません prescriptively incorrect? I could have sworn we had been taught it.
Nov
17
comment What are the differences between じ and ぢ, and ず and づ?
There's also the use of ぢ to write 痔, which has an interesting history... ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E7%97%94#.E6.A6.82.E8.A6.81
Nov
9
answered Reading 塞 and 省: When on and kun readings go together
Nov
8
comment How to translate: “Keep/leave something”. So, how to express intention to leave something unchanged
I'm not the downvoter, but I think ~ておく is only appropriate when the agent performs the action, and not when the state is simply allowed to persist.
Nov
7
comment Are there rules for when 'e' becomes 'a' in compound words?
The compound words all have the structure X of Y, but it seems unlikely that any historical genitive particle like tsu or ga could have yielded a vocalic i. Incidentally, I wonder if there's any evidence linking tsu to the fossilised Korean genitive particle s (e.g. 바닷가 bada-s-ga)...
Nov
6
comment Are there rules for when 'e' becomes 'a' in compound words?
You mention that a+i > e2 > Modern e, and that the original root ends in a. What is the i which yields modern e when the word occurs free and not in a compound?
Nov
6
comment Are there rules for when 'e' becomes 'a' in compound words?
Here's a list of examples.
Oct
31
awarded  Yearling
Oct
10
comment Obligatory zero particle
@istrasci: From Martin "A Reference Grammar of Japanese" §2.3: "In standard spoken Japanese these two particles are obligatorily suppressed... where we would expect N ga wa/mo and N o wa/mo we find only N wa/mo: the opposition of the prime cases of subject vs. object are neutralised." This might be a development in the language, a register difference, or else the grammar might be plain wrong.
Oct
10
comment Obligatory zero particle
True enough, but I think をも is a fossilised form in the modern language.
Oct
10
answered Obligatory zero particle
Aug
16
revised What is the difference between 恰好 and 格好?
added 487 characters in body
Aug
16
answered What is the difference between 恰好 and 格好?
Aug
4
comment Did any writing systems exist before kanji was imported?
Not an answer to your question, but here are some spurious scripts which were invented in the 40s to demonstrate that Japanese did have an indigenous tradition of literacy. (Lamentably, the links have long since rotted.)
Aug
4
revised What do the parts of じゃんけんぽん mean?
What you had before was closer to Mandarin than Cantonese.
Aug
4
suggested suggested edit on What do the parts of じゃんけんぽん mean?
Jul
22
accepted 不被下候: When was it common, and what were the rules?
Jul
16
comment 不被下候: When was it common, and what were the rules?
@sawa: Thanks for pointing those things out. The translation was metaphorical. Also, the incorrectly modified transcription was copied from a site I was looking at while researching the phrase.
Jul
16
revised 不被下候: When was it common, and what were the rules?
deleted 5 characters in body
Jul
16
comment 不被下候: When was it common, and what were the rules?
At least one more example is 不忍池, which by one theory "comes from the habit of young men and women to meet secretly here."