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visits member for 2 years, 6 months
seen Apr 4 at 18:36

Feb
13
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
9
asked Why would one use 当て字?
Dec
14
comment “It's sweet, for sake”
@TokyoNagoya along those lines, we wouldn't say "It's sweet for sake" in English if we know sake is always sweet. We would say "It's sweet even for sake". I'm not sure what the Japanese equivalent of that would be.
Oct
29
awarded  Yearling
Oct
6
awarded  Teacher
Jul
9
accepted How to say “Slice of life anime”?
Jul
9
revised How to say “Slice of life anime”?
Corrected use of "English" where "Japanese" was probably intended.
Jul
9
suggested suggested edit on How to say “Slice of life anime”?
Jul
9
revised How to say “Slice of life anime”?
added 12 characters in body
Jul
9
comment How to say “Slice of life anime”?
Edited. Completely changed the answer.
Jul
9
revised How to say “Slice of life anime”?
added 151 characters in body
Jul
9
comment How to say “Slice of life anime”?
Hmm... there is also the problem that it could get confused with the anime that is titled "日常".
Jul
9
answered How to say “Slice of life anime”?
Jul
9
asked How to say “Slice of life anime”?
Nov
8
awarded  Peer Pressure
Nov
7
comment Usage of 忘れる, 忘れた, 忘れている, 忘れていた
@TsuyoshiIto Thank you for your condescension, but you didn't really respond to my objection. It doesn't make sense. It isn't a question of knowing Japanese or not. At what time did the speaker forget? There is no point to using that verb form without another time reference. See Sawa's answer for an example of how it can be used. I should note that 忘れていた can in fact be used without these time references when the speaker just wants to say that they didn't remember it at a crucial time and were since reminded, but that doesn't seem to be the case here from the immediate context.
Nov
7
awarded  Commentator
Nov
7
comment Usage of 忘れる, 忘れた, 忘れている, 忘れていた
@Tsuyoshi, yes except the usage of もう in that sentence doesn't really make sense without further context. Saying you "had already forgotten" requires another time reference, otherwise it doesn't make sense. I mean it's obvious when you translate to english: "It happened 30 years ago, so I had already forgotten". This only makes sense in a context where they are talking about a time between 30 years ago and the present. The speaker must specify the time at which they had forgotten.
Nov
7
comment Usage of 忘れる, 忘れた, 忘れている, 忘れていた
I am fairly certain that 忘れた is the best answer here, just from my intuition from hearing lots of japanese. I think you would be right if we were talking about a different verb, but 忘れる's conjugations take different meanings then what is normal since it is never an instantaneous event. So, as I say in my answer, 2 takes the meaning of 3 and 3 should not be used.
Nov
7
awarded  Editor