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seen Feb 6 at 1:15

Dec
22
answered How is 「なう」most commonly appended to verbs?
Nov
15
comment What do you say when giving something to somebody?
Related to this - I keep wanting to say どうぞ when giving money to cashiers, but my friends tell me that is strange (because I am under obligation to do so). And I feel uncomfortable saying nothing. Might be my cultural conditioning. What is appropriate in that situation?
Nov
11
comment Does には in this sentence imply vagueness of the source?
About に meaning place: There are three situations to differentiate: に as a destination, に as a stative location, and で as a location of an action. The first one is used only with verbs of motion: 家に行く. The second describes where something is, like 家にいる. The third (で) describes where someone is doing something: 家で食べる. It is ungrammatical to say 家に食べる, or 家でいる. Also, see the difference between the first and the third in 家で飛んでいる "They keep flying (while) inside the house" and 家に飛んでいる "They keep flying into the house". As others said, に in this case is another usage of に altogether, passive agent.
Nov
7
comment What is だって when it's at the beginning of a sentence?
@istraci: Not nearly native, and someone correct me if I'm wrong, but... a) Why is the food the topic of an imperative sentence? Actually, I don't think I've ever seen a topic marker in an imperative sentence. Maybe it could be a contrastive は, but what does it contrast with? Things that fell off the plate? b) Can you use みんな for non-people? It reads more like telling everyone to eat what's on the plates, and not telling one person to eat everything on the plate.
Nov
7
comment How and when to use 「そうですね」?
そうですね is an answer to きょうはいい天気ですね ("Today is nice, isn't it?"), and expresses agreeing with opinions/feelings of others. そうです is answer to これはあなたの財布ですか ("Is this your wallet?").
Nov
1
comment What does “jukai” mean?
alc.co.jp (extensive, but doesn't accept romaji and has no pronunciation guides) tangorin.com and jisho.org (smaller, but friendlier to foreigners)
Oct
31
awarded  Commentator
Oct
31
comment Article versus postposition
As I said, I'm no more a native English speaker than a native Japanese speaker, so feel free to correct me. Although, I'm a programmer, so that's where my imagery regarding these two words mainly comes from. An overriden variable can't be accessed since it's shadowed by something else; while overwriting a variable just means changing its contents. No idea how non-programmers view them :)
Oct
31
awarded  Critic
Oct
31
comment Article versus postposition
If I understand English well enough (and tell me if I don't), override would mean that one's meaning replaces the other's, being somehow "stronger". However, in case of も and は vs. が and を, the meaning of both is retained, but the phonetic expression of が and を disappears. I figured "overwrite" is as good an explanation as any.
Oct
26
comment How to exhaustively list predicates in a non-temporal way?
@TsuyoshiIto: My point was that 〜たり already serves for listing things worth mentioning, since the things you didn't mention obviously weren't.
Oct
26
comment How to express: I am going to Japan to study?
@TsuyoshiIto: You have a point, I stand corrected.
Oct
26
answered What dialects use だべ?
Oct
26
comment How to express: I am going to Japan to study?
@TsuyoshiIto: It is colloquial, but very common, by を-dropping from 日本語の勉強をしに行く. To exaggerate a bit, no-one really uses を unless speaking formally. (Of course in that case, it still functions as a noun+suru, not as a nominal verb, so no verb complements or modifiers like objects or adverbs).
Oct
26
awarded  Teacher
Oct
26
comment How to exhaustively list predicates in a non-temporal way?
How do you possibly exhaustively list what you did in a day? In your example, you are malnourished, constipated, and really really need to pee. You also suffer from insomnia, and everything you did took really really long. Also, you are a medical miracle, not requiring air (since apparently you did not bother to breathe). No-one called you on the phone; if they did, maybe it's while you were in the store, since you didn't take it with you, unless you had it from the last day. Etc, etc... There's a reason such a construct is not in any language. I'd use たり, implying irrelevance of the rest.
Oct
26
answered Article versus postposition
Oct
26
comment Article versus postposition
@KarlKnechtel: Some other case markers: ablative から, allative へ, instrumental and locative で, while に can be taken as dative, inessive, ergative or illative, I think. However: や、と are connective particles, not cases in their own right; さ and ね are mostly non-semantic, inserted for pragmatic reasons (and thus not cases); ばかり and だけ serve another function entirely. And then you get into clausal particles like かしら or ぜ, which no-one would even put forth as candidates for case markers. In fact there's a lot more non-case particles than case-marking ones.
Oct
26
comment Article versus postposition
@KarlKnechtel: Many are case markers, but は and も are not. They stack on top of case markers, overwriting them in case of が and を.
Oct
26
comment What differences should I look out for between male vs female speech?
Regarding の, I think questions a la 何してるの? are fine for both sexes. The problem are explanatory sentences like 忘れたの, in which girls use の without the too assertive だ, while men sound gay unless they say んだ/んです。