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Feb
21
comment Does がち mean “in excess”?
I've been taught it normally expresses a bad tendency. (By which I mean, 太郎さんはおいしい料理を作りがちだ would sound strange.) Is that correct? If so, it might be a step towards explaining the reasoning behind the "excess" translation.
Dec
30
comment Why is water polite but ice not?
So... お財布 is essential? I guess you could say that... :P
Dec
23
comment How is 「なう」most commonly appended to verbs?
Again, we are not in disagreement about the form itself. However, the most natural way to explain the meaning of verb tenses when used with 〜なう is to compare with 〜ところ. As for "non-past", I use it to contrast with "past", because I hate the term "present" in Japanese with a passion (Japanese does not have a present tense), along with many linguists. It's "(non-past) form", not "non-(past form)". So when I say non-past form, it's to signify たべる、たべます as opposed to たべた which is past. Sorry I didn't use the proper Japanese grammatical term for it, but I don't know it.
Dec
23
comment How is 「なう」most commonly appended to verbs?
Nouns don't have tenses, and thus aren't as confusing. OP: "I want to know what the most common way to add なう after a verb is." - I don't think we have contradictory answers, just complementary: you explain the form 〜なう attaches to, while I explain what each of the verbal tenses means when it attaches to a verb, as per direct inquiry from the OP (also, the question's title), since by the lower part of the question it is clearly the differing tenses that are confusing the OP.
Dec
23
comment How is 「なう」most commonly appended to verbs?
I did say "with verbs" though. I was trying to explain not really the form, but the fact that the tenses are not random. As for purely the form that is being attached to, I will agree with you.
Dec
22
answered How is 「なう」most commonly appended to verbs?
Nov
15
comment What do you say when giving something to somebody?
Related to this - I keep wanting to say どうぞ when giving money to cashiers, but my friends tell me that is strange (because I am under obligation to do so). And I feel uncomfortable saying nothing. Might be my cultural conditioning. What is appropriate in that situation?
Nov
11
comment Does には in this sentence imply vagueness of the source?
About に meaning place: There are three situations to differentiate: に as a destination, に as a stative location, and で as a location of an action. The first one is used only with verbs of motion: 家に行く. The second describes where something is, like 家にいる. The third (で) describes where someone is doing something: 家で食べる. It is ungrammatical to say 家に食べる, or 家でいる. Also, see the difference between the first and the third in 家で飛んでいる "They keep flying (while) inside the house" and 家に飛んでいる "They keep flying into the house". As others said, に in this case is another usage of に altogether, passive agent.
Nov
7
comment What is だって when it's at the beginning of a sentence?
@istraci: Not nearly native, and someone correct me if I'm wrong, but... a) Why is the food the topic of an imperative sentence? Actually, I don't think I've ever seen a topic marker in an imperative sentence. Maybe it could be a contrastive は, but what does it contrast with? Things that fell off the plate? b) Can you use みんな for non-people? It reads more like telling everyone to eat what's on the plates, and not telling one person to eat everything on the plate.
Nov
7
comment How and when to use 「そうですね」?
そうですね is an answer to きょうはいい天気ですね ("Today is nice, isn't it?"), and expresses agreeing with opinions/feelings of others. そうです is answer to これはあなたの財布ですか ("Is this your wallet?").
Nov
1
comment What does “jukai” mean?
alc.co.jp (extensive, but doesn't accept romaji and has no pronunciation guides) tangorin.com and jisho.org (smaller, but friendlier to foreigners)
Oct
31
awarded  Commentator
Oct
31
comment Article versus postposition
As I said, I'm no more a native English speaker than a native Japanese speaker, so feel free to correct me. Although, I'm a programmer, so that's where my imagery regarding these two words mainly comes from. An overriden variable can't be accessed since it's shadowed by something else; while overwriting a variable just means changing its contents. No idea how non-programmers view them :)
Oct
31
awarded  Critic
Oct
31
comment Article versus postposition
If I understand English well enough (and tell me if I don't), override would mean that one's meaning replaces the other's, being somehow "stronger". However, in case of も and は vs. が and を, the meaning of both is retained, but the phonetic expression of が and を disappears. I figured "overwrite" is as good an explanation as any.
Oct
26
comment How to exhaustively list predicates in a non-temporal way?
@TsuyoshiIto: My point was that 〜たり already serves for listing things worth mentioning, since the things you didn't mention obviously weren't.
Oct
26
comment How to express: I am going to Japan to study?
@TsuyoshiIto: You have a point, I stand corrected.
Oct
26
answered What dialects use だべ?
Oct
26
comment How to express: I am going to Japan to study?
@TsuyoshiIto: It is colloquial, but very common, by を-dropping from 日本語の勉強をしに行く. To exaggerate a bit, no-one really uses を unless speaking formally. (Of course in that case, it still functions as a noun+suru, not as a nominal verb, so no verb complements or modifiers like objects or adverbs).
Oct
26
awarded  Teacher