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seen Sep 12 at 8:11

Aug
26
awarded  Announcer
Oct
26
awarded  Yearling
May
31
comment Why does 腰抜け mean coward?
Also probably worth mentioning: 腰があるうどん is udon which is not overboiled, still has some chewiness to it (dang, I suck at describing food).
May
31
comment Particles で and も and でも
However, note that there is another use of でも that cannot be translated as "also", but rather "or something". ピザでも食べない? "Want to go grab a pizza or something?"
May
31
comment Why are there two words 算数 and 数学 representing different fields?
I believe one is like a craft, whereas the other more like a science. Like the difference between home economics class (at least the part dealing with cooking) and university of gastronomic sciences. They're undeniably the same field (food preparation), but one focuses on basic practical techniques, tips and tricks, while the other will include chemistry, agronomy, and bunches of other deeper concepts that let you understand food in detail.
May
31
comment Polite speech and うち よそ
Dangit, [他所]{よそ} (had to look up formatting for ruby :P )
May
31
comment Polite speech and うち よそ
I suspect it's 他所[よそ].
May
17
comment Stative verbs: ~ている vs ~てある vs ~(ら)れる
In addition, 窓が開いている can mean "the window is opening" (if it's doing so sufficiently slowly to warrant a progressive, or sufficiently often to warrant an iterative).
May
17
comment Difference between 十分 and 十二分
@Chris: I am not sure, but I'd compare it to English 100% and 110%. You can say "I'll give it my 110%", but it sounds weird if you say "I'll give it my 113%". One is an idiom; the other one is a weird random number.
May
17
comment Which readings would you use to pronounce people's names?
Relevant - site collecting "stupid" Japanese names. Like Koron-chan (香織ちゃん). a) nothing to do with kanji; b) Imagine the embarassment of self-introduction to foreigners. "Hello, I am Colon."
May
17
comment What are the rules determining the use of the dash in katakana?
@ZhenLin: You may or may not hear a syllabic break; I believe the more important point is that there is a morphemic boundary, which is preserved in orthography.
May
17
comment What are the rules determining the use of the dash in katakana?
@istrasci: But スペイン is pronounced su-pe-i-n, not su-pē-n.
May
17
comment Does 切った mean to “cut out” or “cut from”?
In your first sentence, "from" comes from から, not from 切る.
Feb
23
comment Particle confusion
To add to a good answer: Some particles are adverbial modifiers, and you can understand their usage as a point of grammar (e.g. "ペンで"="using a pen"). Some, however, are case markers, and the best way to learn which particles go along with which verbs is to learn them together with the verbs. Don't learn that "get off"="降りる", "get on"="乗る"; instead, learn that "get off from __"="__を降りる", "get on __"="__に乗る".
Feb
21
comment Does がち mean “in excess”?
@sawa: "見逃してしまいがち" -> "prone to mistakes" -> "makes a lot of mistakes (and it's a bad thing)" -> "makes too many mistakes" -> "excess". Not straightforward, but somewhat understandable. People who are not used to explaining language nuances can often have very nebulous (and wrong) word definitions.
Feb
21
comment Does がち mean “in excess”?
I've been taught it normally expresses a bad tendency. (By which I mean, 太郎さんはおいしい料理を作りがちだ would sound strange.) Is that correct? If so, it might be a step towards explaining the reasoning behind the "excess" translation.
Dec
30
comment Why is water polite but ice not?
So... お財布 is essential? I guess you could say that... :P
Dec
23
comment How is 「なう」most commonly appended to verbs?
Again, we are not in disagreement about the form itself. However, the most natural way to explain the meaning of verb tenses when used with 〜なう is to compare with 〜ところ. As for "non-past", I use it to contrast with "past", because I hate the term "present" in Japanese with a passion (Japanese does not have a present tense), along with many linguists. It's "(non-past) form", not "non-(past form)". So when I say non-past form, it's to signify たべる、たべます as opposed to たべた which is past. Sorry I didn't use the proper Japanese grammatical term for it, but I don't know it.
Dec
23
comment How is 「なう」most commonly appended to verbs?
Nouns don't have tenses, and thus aren't as confusing. OP: "I want to know what the most common way to add なう after a verb is." - I don't think we have contradictory answers, just complementary: you explain the form 〜なう attaches to, while I explain what each of the verbal tenses means when it attaches to a verb, as per direct inquiry from the OP (also, the question's title), since by the lower part of the question it is clearly the differing tenses that are confusing the OP.
Dec
23
comment How is 「なう」most commonly appended to verbs?
I did say "with verbs" though. I was trying to explain not really the form, but the fact that the tenses are not random. As for purely the form that is being attached to, I will agree with you.