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Nov
6
revised Why do Japanese speakers have difficulty pronouncing “L”?
Tried to improve question title.
Nov
6
suggested suggested edit on Why do Japanese speakers have difficulty pronouncing “L”?
Nov
6
comment Why is “Xy” pronounced as “Ki Shi” in Xylitol「キシリトール」?
The origin of the word is not a direct indication of its pronunciation -- scientific words are regularly created out of Latin and it's a dead language. In the case of xylitol, though the word may be Greek in composition, it is almost certainly not the case that the word actually came to Japanese (or any other language) from Greece per se.
Nov
6
suggested suggested edit on What differences should I look out for between male vs female speech?
Nov
6
comment Why do Japanese speakers have difficulty pronouncing “L”?
"I've never really understood why learning systems adopted "R's" when "L's" seem closer in sound" -- I'm guessing here you are refering to romaji using r instead of l. Maybe you are thinking about the English r, but generally, the Japanese r sounds the same as r in most other languages, so it does make sense to use r instead of l in romanization systems.
Nov
6
revised Why do Japanese speakers have difficulty pronouncing “L”?
Edited for legibility
Nov
6
awarded  Critic
Nov
6
revised Why do Japanese speakers have difficulty pronouncing “L”?
added 3 characters in body
Nov
6
comment Why do Japanese speakers have difficulty pronouncing “L”?
l does exist in Japanese, but not as a distinct phoneme (ask a Japanese speaker to say ringo slowly, it should sound like l, especially for women). Furthermore, if you are going to use n as an analogy, it would be to indicate where the tongue is placed, and that place is the same for l, n, d, t, s, z, ts and dz -- all of which are Japanese sounds.
Nov
6
comment Why do Japanese speakers have difficulty pronouncing “L”?
l and r both exist in Japanese, but they are allophones of a single phoneme. And I'm not sure what a cross between English R and L would sound like, but certainly not what Japanese would pronounce in a word like Engrish. I would downvote, but I think your last comparison with x and sh is valid.
Nov
6
revised Why do Japanese speakers have difficulty pronouncing “L”?
added 458 characters in body
Nov
6
answered Why do Japanese speakers have difficulty pronouncing “L”?
Oct
21
awarded  Yearling
Oct
20
awarded  Nice Question
Oct
17
comment Except for pitch, what are the differences in pronunciation between Kansaiben and Tokyoben?
Japanese has pitch accent, English has stress. French has neither. All three languages have intonation; it's a different thing entirely. You can say boku with raising intonation or not, depending on your intent, but boku will always remain HL.
Oct
17
comment Rules for emphasizing by lengthening sounds
Since g and ng (as in English -ing) are interchangeable, you can have ng-g, gg and double ng. However, you will never get g-gn.
Oct
17
suggested suggested edit on Except for pitch, what are the differences in pronunciation between Kansaiben and Tokyoben?
Oct
17
comment Except for pitch, what are the differences in pronunciation between Kansaiben and Tokyoben?
No. Japanese has pitch accent whereby every mora surfaces as either high or low, which differs from intonation, which every language has.
Oct
16
answered Rules for emphasizing by lengthening sounds
Sep
30
asked Except for pitch, what are the differences in pronunciation between Kansaiben and Tokyoben?