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Jan
29
comment ~うございます - keigo い-adjectives
@TsuyoshiIto: As I'm re-reading this now, how would you conjugate 大きい? 大きゅうございます?
Jan
25
comment What is the name of the wooden hook support on the walls of traditional Japanese rooms?
Note for those that have furigana turned off on the site, that here 長押 is read なげし. However, in this age of technology, it has also come to be read as ながおし, meaning "long press" or "hold", esp. of buttons, touchscreens, etc. Though this reading may also have the accompanying okurigana as 長押し.
Jan
24
comment What is the difference between 上{あ}げる and 挙{あ}げる?
See THIS POST for a good explanation on homophonic kanji distinction.
Jan
22
comment Passive form - The exact difference between を and が
@DanielSafari: If you mean 犬は猫にケーキを食べられた, yes, that's acceptable and correct too.
Jan
22
comment 方 - also read ほう when referring to a person?
@JesseGood: I disagree that ほう is more commonly used that かた. かた is not at all uncommon, and it's seen/heard/used all over the place.
Jan
15
comment Interpretation of て+もらえる
He says "They won't know it's you". Does he mean without the mask they won't know, or with the mask they won't know? Either way, using 〜てもらえない still seems like a strange translation to me.
Jan
15
comment Fast Food Conversation - Any Practical Guides?
Welcome to JLU! I think this question may be too open-ended and runs the risk the being closed. You might refine it by asking something more specific, like how to say "dine-in" vs. "carry-out", etc. On a side note, I'm not sure that a cashier would ask you how you want to pay, unless credit cards are becoming way more prevalent than they used to be.
Jan
14
comment What's the difference between 触る and 触れる?
The only part I'm not sure I agree with is 触れる being used only for "light" touching. Because I've seen signs in museums, stores, etc. like 手を触れないように or 手を触れないでください, and that (to me) indicates something more forceful.
Jan
14
comment Is it acceptable in Japanese to write kanji characters in the Chinese style?
Is the stroke order for that hard to remember? I can't even think of how you'd do it wrong. Putting the horizontal line as stroke 4 instead of 2?
Jan
14
comment Is it acceptable in Japanese to write kanji characters in the Chinese style?
@ixsccd: Where did you hear ふつとり for ? I've only ever heard it called ふるとり.
Jan
11
comment Should I say 失礼{しつれい}します before hanging up the phone if the other person called me?
@Dono: Some people? Like everyone I know does. Haha!
Jan
7
comment Is “anyone” 人はいます or 誰でも?
誰でも is more like "whoever". Same with the other 〜でもs: いつでも → "whenever"; どこでも → "wherever"; etc.
Jan
7
comment Usage of noun-modifying である
Tangential question: the application of the description ピアニストである seems ambiguous. That is, it seems like it may be applied to either or 私の姉. Of course the context makes it clear, but in another situation, would there be a better way to specifically indicate the sister? Maybe 私のピアニストである姉? Although that sounds funny/wrong to me.
Jan
6
comment What does exactly does さま mean in dictionary definitions?
@TsuyoshiIto: Oh, it sounded like you meant that if you knew where it came from, then you could understand why the poster was confused, etc.
Jan
5
comment What does exactly does さま mean in dictionary definitions?
@TsuyoshiIto: Does knowing the source really help with answering the question?
Jan
3
comment How can I say “the leader(s) of the club” in Japanese
What about words with ? Like 班長, 首班, or 主班? Maybe gives a slightly different context, I'm not sure.
Dec
27
comment What is the function of と in とある?
Example sentence?
Dec
21
comment Does 寒気がする really mean “have a chill” or is it just cold?
What would you say to convey having non-illness chills? I am a 寒がり, so there are some winter mornings where I'm not sick and I just cannot get warm. I've used 悪寒 before (今朝はずっと悪寒!), but from what you said, this wasn't correct because I wasn't sick.
Dec
21
comment Does 寒気がする really mean “have a chill” or is it just cold?
Does 寒気(さむけ) overlap with 悪寒 then? Although I don't think 悪寒 implies having a fever/cold, does it?
Dec
21
comment Does 寒気がする really mean “have a chill” or is it just cold?
So "have a chill" = "spine-tingling" in that sense. I wonder how many dictionaries have that as part of the definition.