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I love to study Japanese!


Jan
9
comment Japanese translation for “bakka!” (Not Baka)
"Out of the two you provided for Bakka, are they different character sets?" -- Yes, ばっか is Hiragana and バッカ is Katakana.
Jan
9
comment Japanese translation for “bakka!” (Not Baka)
Baka means "idiot" or "fool". "Bakka" just sounds like an emphasis of "Baka". However, if you say that one of the artists goes by "Bakka", that doesn't imply it has any relation to "Baka", or even any meaning at all. It could be something completely different. As an example, in Japanese you'd say "Bakku appu" for "backup". It could be just a contraction of that. Unless you specifically know something about the artist, I wouldn't try to extract any meaning from it.
Jan
9
answered Japanese translation for “bakka!” (Not Baka)
Jan
8
comment [潔]{いさぎよ}い meaning
+1 for "gg" reference.
Jan
7
comment Are honorifics used for dead people?
@TsuyoshiIto: perhaps it's not in the formally-accepted group of honorifics, but conceptually I don't see why not. Even if you're not showing respect to the deceased person (which I disagree with you, that you're not), you're not showing respect to tea when you say お茶.
Jan
7
comment Are honorifics used for dead people?
Touché. I never knew that. Guess you learn something new all the time. OK, you can change it back (or add both readings) if you feel like it.
Jan
7
comment Are honorifics used for dead people?
I've never seen it as チンギス, including in the dictionary. Have you?
Jan
6
comment Are honorifics used for dead people?
I think even in English saying "The late Mr. Johnson" is pretty respectful. Better than saying "that dead guy, Mr. Johnson". is already an honorific, but I would go so far as to say is too. Even though it's just a description of their deceased state, it seems that you are showing respect toward the person.
Jan
6
revised Are honorifics used for dead people?
Typo on katakana for "Genghis Khan"
Jan
6
answered Are honorifics used for dead people?
Jan
5
comment When should I use「かも」 versus 「アヒル」?
You might be interested in this related post.
Jan
4
asked Stroke order for han-dakuten
Jan
2
comment Why is the stroke order of も peculiar?
jref.com/forum/learning-japanese-64/…
Jan
2
comment Sound mimesis (or 擬音語【ぎおんご】 or 擬態語【ぎたいご】) of ビ and シッ
@TsuyoshiIto: yes, of course horizontal text is read left-to-right, but because of the position of the character, it's hard to see “ビシッ” as one word (if you don't know the meaning) as Flaw said.
Jan
2
comment Sound mimesis (or 擬音語【ぎおんご】 or 擬態語【ぎたいご】) of ビ and シッ
@Flaw: Agreed, especially since the text "bubbles" go from right-to-left, it seems super counter-intuitive that the ビ and シッ would be left-to-right.
Dec
31
comment How do you know when to use みな or みんな?
I've heard that みな means "everyone (including me)", and みんな means "everyone (else but me)", but I don't know how true that is.
Dec
19
comment What is the difference between なぜなら、だから、and なので?
@sawa: Sure, that's fine. It's just one of those things that translates a little strange.
Dec
19
comment What is the difference between なぜなら、だから、and なので?
あのラーメン屋は人を待たせる is better translated as "makes you wait" instead of "lets". Even so, in English, it's more natural to say "They make you wait a long time" where "they" = "the restaurant". However, more than putting the focus on the restaurant, I think the most natural way to say it would be "The wait at that ramen shop is always (too) long".
Dec
16
awarded  Nice Question
Dec
8
comment もらえる, 見える rules
見える does not exactly mean 見ることが 出来る. There is a difference between 見える and 見られる.