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Oct
3
accepted Why does 微妙 become “sucky” in slang usage?
Oct
2
comment How is the “のです” working here?
thqnk you for the explanation
Oct
2
comment How is the “のです” working here?
I asked a native speaker this and they said the のです didn't change the meaning, it just was more of a literary device to avoid ending with ます, in the same way that an English essay might not want to continually begin a sentence with I.
Oct
2
comment Why does 微妙 become “sucky” in slang usage?
That did help, thank you. When i asked a native speaker they too mentioned 微妙 違う and said that the 微妙 was used to soften the 違う to make it a little less severe and thus more ambiguous. They said if you flat out plainly just use 微妙 alone it was almost always negative. This is purely colloquial language though, rather than whatever form it takes on in its literary usages (I have no input on that).
Oct
2
asked How is the “のです” working here?
Oct
2
comment Why does 微妙 become “sucky” in slang usage?
Out of curiosity, would you use 微妙 to describe the delicate subtlety of an artwork or of an exquisite meal? I'm just interested as to the nuance, as "subtle" usually has a positive slant to it in English, but the last time I asked people about 微妙 it seemed to lean more towards the negative.
Oct
2
revised Why does 微妙 become “sucky” in slang usage?
added 1 characters in body
Oct
1
asked Why does 微妙 become “sucky” in slang usage?
Oct
1
comment “一目ぼれから長持ちする関係は望めません。” この表現のニュアンスを説明して頂けませんか?
Thanks Matt. On the hope/expect point, I was wondering about that because I was mostly familiar with 望む for wish/hope/desire. Would you use it for negative things? For instance in the sentences "I expect to die a horrible death" or "I expect human civilization will come to a terrible end".(both of these instances not something I would want)
Sep
30
accepted “一目ぼれから長持ちする関係は望めません。” この表現のニュアンスを説明して頂けませんか?
Sep
30
comment “一目ぼれから長持ちする関係は望めません。” この表現のニュアンスを説明して頂けませんか?
thank you. The fact that my attempts at translation did not strike you as incorrect gives me some hope.
Sep
30
comment “一目ぼれから長持ちする関係は望めません。” この表現のニュアンスを説明して頂けませんか?
Perhaps the first translation is a bit more like a proverb, while the two I supplied, while still having a proverbial feel, could work more as admonishments in a normal conversation.
Sep
30
comment “一目ぼれから長持ちする関係は望めません。” この表現のニュアンスを説明して頂けませんか?
"Falling in love at first sight won't bring you a lasting relationship." Here the verb that the applies to the subject -bring- does not necessitate any first person volition. In the second translation, the subject cannot hope for a long lasting relationship because the results are obvious. In the third, if the subject cannot expect a long-lasting relationship, it doesn't necessarily mean they hoped for it. Please excuse my lack of knowledge when it comes to proper terms for grammar.
Sep
30
asked “一目ぼれから長持ちする関係は望めません。” この表現のニュアンスを説明して頂けませんか?
Sep
30
accepted 人生に生き甲斐を求めてギターを習い始めた。 Can 求める mean give?
Sep
30
comment Help with adverbs with とする and としている
cont.- Yet in all the ways we have tried to translate it into english ( perhaps with my last attempt being an exception), the sentence has ended up sounding like something one would only see in written english- one would rarely say aloud "what a lively expression she has!" ... it would seem more natural just to say "what an expression" or "look at that expression". So, is the original Japanese sentence a spoken colloquial example, or a more literary one?
Sep
30
comment Help with adverbs with とする and としている
After the helpful input on my original question, I've ended up with this very loose english translation: "What a vivacious expression she has...she's so cute!" I tried to make this as colloquial an english expression as I could. What I would like to know is this: to me, the original japanese expression seems like something one would say aloud in spoken japanese.
Sep
30
comment Does anyone know which おり this is?
Thanks for the input. My very loose translation is "What a lively expression she has...she's so cute!"
Sep
30
accepted Does anyone know which おり this is?
Sep
30
comment Does anyone know which おり this is?
Thank you very much. In the provided translation it is implied that she is pretty/cute because of her lively expression, while in your translation what is pretty/cute is her expression. Which do you think is more correct? My initial impulse was to assign the おり with something of a "because" twist to it, as I've seen this pattern as you've described it, acting as a comma.