438 reputation
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location Kyoto-shi, Japan
age
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen Aug 2 '12 at 7:06
Canadian expat living in Kyoto. I need to learn MATLAB scripting for numerical analysis for economics. I took a C+ class a long time ago and tried to learn a little HTML, but otherwise I'm a total coding noob. In Japan we'd say 'yoroshiku onegaishimasu' - thanks in advance for taking care of me.

Jul
20
comment How can I say “we met at x event” politely in an email?
Of course. Thank you very much.
Nov
12
comment Is there a difference between に伴う and を伴う?
Great answer. Thanks for your help.
Sep
8
comment Colloquial use of「〜て〔い〕ない」, maybe instead of 「〜なかった」
I understand why you think it sounds odd here, but the point of the example was to show the reasoning behind using 「〜て〔い〕ない」 for volitional verbs. Using 「しなかった」 is at best evasive and at worst incorrect (at least in response to a direct question of this nature). To me, that just reinforces my original point, that people use 「〜て〔い〕ない」 to be clear about volition.
Sep
7
comment Colloquial use of「〜て〔い〕ない」, maybe instead of 「〜なかった」
I don't see anything wrong with the English sentence, but maybe it's just me. In a high school classroom the person asking the question may have the expectation that the other party is going to do the essay, but that doesn't mean that the other party is intending to do it. If he or she willfully or neglectfully didn't write the essay despite knowing it was due, it seems to me that "I didn't do it," would fit perfectly. It establishes that the person didnt write the essay, while being intentionally vague about any intent to get it finished.
Sep
7
comment Colloquial use of「〜て〔い〕ない」, maybe instead of 「〜なかった」
What if the speaker had no intention of writing the essay? It's my understanding that 「書いていない」 means "I haven't written it yet (but I intend to)", while 「書かなかった」 means "I didn't write it (and, possibly, I don't intend to)."
Sep
7
comment Colloquial use of「〜て〔い〕ない」, maybe instead of 「〜なかった」
Thanks, but could you explain why 「しませんでした」 would be inappropriate here? Would 「書きませんでした」 also be inappropriate?
Sep
7
comment Where does the いかない in ~わけにはいかない come from?
Great question! I always thought it was interesting that 「わけにはいかない」 uses the "regular" 「行く」 while 「なくてはいけない」 uses the potential form. To make matters worse, expressions like 「うまくいく to go well」 use the "regular" form strictly, so 「うまくいけた」would be incorrect, for instance. It seems like there are three イクs: the regular, volitional "I go" イク, the non volitional "it goes" イク, and the bastard child イケル, wherever that fits in.
Sep
7
comment The many ways to say “and” in Japanese
Great list, but I wonder about your 「勉強」 sentence. Usually, if there's a change (such as in the speaker's ability to speak English), don't people usually use conditional expressions like 「〜たら」?
Sep
7
comment Non-distinguished animal pairs in Japanese
It's a vastly different language with a vastly different history. The non-distinguished animal pairs you speak of are one of the many dissimilarities that make Japanese so difficult (rewarding) to study. English and Japanese have different building blocks (often Greek/Latin roots in English and kanji words in Japanese). In a language where basic ideas need to be individually distinguished with unique kanji, being economical with the number of symbols seems to be the right way to go, no?
Aug
28
comment The reality of answering いいえ to a negative question
I would add the caveat that people often avoid answering with はい・いいえ in confusing situations like invitations (飲みに行きませんか Would you like to go drinking? ー 〔 ×いいえ、〕行きましょうよ Let's go!) or polite yes/no questions (31番でお待ちのお客様、いらっしゃいませんか Is the customer waiting under number 31 here?). I don't know if the OP meant to include these usages in the question, though.
Aug
27
comment I can't stand 立つ【た・つ】: Do all its meanings derive from “stand”?
Hahaha, that's really funny. I noticed when I was reading code words that it was full of stereotypes but I just figured it was because he was old. I'm definitely going to grab a copy of Women of the Orient now though!