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Sep
29
comment Are there any risks in self-learning the kana?
@Ignacio: Agreed, many kana books are poor. Mine were poor. I'm glad I'm not the only one who thinks so. :)
Sep
29
comment Is it ok for non-japanese to refer to themselves as 僕{ぼく} and if not why?
@TsuyoshiIto: Sorry, perhaps I did misinterpret your comment, but I think my response largely stands. It's easy to come up with less extreme examples: even a slightly dodgy accent or mix of dialects can make non-formal speech sound slightly odd. If you're talking about non-native speakers with a level of Japanese indistinguishable from that of a native speaker, well, I concede that that might be a different matter. But such people are so rare that "non-Japanese people sound strange using 僕" might not actually be particularly far from the truth.
Sep
28
awarded  Teacher
Sep
28
answered Are there any risks in self-learning the kana?
Sep
28
comment Is it ok for non-japanese to refer to themselves as 僕{ぼく} and if not why?
(And perhaps bear in mind that many non-native speakers think real Japanese is like anime Japanese...)
Sep
28
comment Is it ok for non-japanese to refer to themselves as 僕{ぼく} and if not why?
@TsuyoshiIto: It seems a bit silly to call it "prejudice" to me. Non-native speakers will start off learning a neutral, perhaps verging on formal variant of the language. The fact that 僕 sounds weird is perhaps just because non-native speakers have enough trouble grasping formal language without also trying to throw casual language into the same mix. (There are many entire books and reams of research papers dedicated to the subtleties involved in mixing polite and plain verb forms in conversation, for example.)
Aug
24
comment What's the difference between wa (は) and ga (が)?
@Karl: yes, but "suki" isn't a verb that can take an object. Actually, if you look carefully, "suki" is a na-adjective! It means something more like "liked" or "dear". So the first sentence reads something like "Aiko is liked (implicitly: by me)", and the second more like "as far as Aiko is concerned, (it) is liked".