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Aug
30
comment How 「えい」 should be pronounced in the words like 英語, 先生, etc?
Awesome! It all makes sense!
Aug
29
comment What are the main differences between 京都弁(Kyoto-ben) and 大阪弁(Osaka-ben)
Also, to add to your links, here's a site in English that is designed for learning Kansai-ben and includes a pretty large set of video and audio examples. It mainly contrasts between kansai-ben and standard Japanese, but there is also a information about Osaka-ben (especially in the grammar notes). kansaiben.com
Aug
29
comment What are the main differences between 京都弁(Kyoto-ben) and 大阪弁(Osaka-ben)
The ocn.ne.jp link isn't working for me (gives a 404 not found page).
Aug
29
comment How 「えい」 should be pronounced in the words like 英語, 先生, etc?
As for the 10 permutations of distinct 2-vowel sequences "(/ai, oi, ui, ie, ae, oe, ue, io, ao, uo/ excluding /ei/)". What about /au/, as in 払う (harau) or 行う (okonau)? Does this list just categorically exclude verbs?
Aug
4
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Apr
24
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Apr
11
comment Pronunciation of す in です and the end of ます verbs
I think one instance where it tends to be pronounced is when asking a question using desu/masu tai, but dropping the question particle and using rising intonation at the end. For example: Ikimasu?
Mar
29
comment “からだけ” vs “だけから”, which is grammatical?
Do they both have exactly the same meaning?
Mar
27
revised How to say two actions are the cause of a third?
Even though it can't be used in this case, kara can be used for other types of reason. Using 'purpose' disambiguates this.
Mar
27
suggested approved edit on How to say two actions are the cause of a third?
Jan
23
comment Why is it 日本語がわかります instead of 日本語をわかります?
These verbs are still transitive verbs as transitivity refers to whether or not the verb accepts an object. It's just that these verbs mark their objects with が rather than を. Instead, the distinction between these two classes of verbs is whether or not they are stative. Also, while there are sentences in Japanese that do have multiple subjects, these examples do not.
Nov
30
comment Do 気が[付]{つ}く and 気[付]{づ}く have the same meaning?
I think 'prove' is too strong of a word. I don't think it can logically follow just from what has been said that they are exactly the same. Perhaps there is some factor (social, cultural, contextual, etc.) influencing their use. In this case, they would have the same meaning at a surface level, but could convey something about the speaker, the listener, and/or the situation. I have no idea whether this is the case, especially since all the examples we have exist (mostly) outside of a context.
Nov
30
comment Do 気が[付]{つ}く and 気[付]{づ}く have the same meaning?
It appears that they do have the same meaning. Maybe this is no different than any other case of particle deletion?
Nov
30
comment Do 気が[付]{つ}く and 気[付]{づ}く have the same meaning?
As far as I can tell, 気がつく cannot directly connect to a noun or verb phrase without a particle in between it. You would something like 忘れたことに気がついた。That being said, after looking through a collection of sample sentences, both with and without が, there doesn't seem to be a distinction relating to clause length. I'm unable to offer a better explanation right now, so I'll have to defer to someone else.
Nov
29
comment Aren't がる and たがる the same thing?
@TsuyoshiIto To me, it seems like tai, hoshii, etc., would all be acceptable with pretty much any grammatical form that makes it so the statement is not a direct expression of fact. So anything from: ようだ、みたい、そうだ、らしい、だろう、と思う、はず、わけ、etc. seem like they should all be acceptable. Does that sound reasonable to you?
Nov
15
comment How do you pronounce を after a subject?
I think it's also important to note that some native speakers (especially teachers) tend to slow down their speech when talking to language learners, and in doing so may also insert a pause between the preceding word and を, even though this is not representative of natural speech. Also, when emphasizing particle choice, or chunking a sentence so that it's more digestible, it's very common, especially among teachers, to pronounce the particles with different intonation than would be found in more natural speech.