400 reputation
16
bio website traffic.ps.utah.gov/query
location Utah
age 39
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen Feb 20 '12 at 15:23

Software Developer for Utah Department of Public Safety.


Aug
18
comment Using な in positive instead of negative imperative (e.g. 行きな)
@Zhen Lin: You deserve credit for half an answer. Other people can fill in the blanks with their answers. I'm not a usage expert either, but I think you're right about it being slightly patronizing just as なさい would be.
Aug
10
comment Is じゃないです equally correct as じゃありません?
Nice. This makes a lot of sense - very clear. さすがプロー。
Aug
10
comment Is じゃないです equally correct as じゃありません?
@sawa: I don't understand "uneducated people cannot use じゃありません"? Cannot use it on what grounds? That they haven't learned it? I suppose it's not as commonly heard as じゃないです, so it's possible they've never learned it. But I have a hard time buying that.
Aug
10
comment Is じゃないです equally correct as じゃありません?
@Nicolas: That's right. じゃありません is a shortened form of ではありません. So ではありません and ではないです are more formal than じゃないです and じゃありません。But in answer to the question, they are both correct. I don't know that one is more 'correct' than the other. じゃないです is certainly more commonly spoken than じゃありません。Most common in speech is simply じゃない - but it's obviously less formal / polite too.
Aug
8
comment 寂しい can mean “pathetic”?
Agreed. even in the examples given (cheater, robber, lazy person), referring to them as 寂しい would still indicate lonely, no friends, not 'pathetic' or 'loser'.
Aug
8
comment Does the Japanese language only have negative terms for flirting?
@千里ちゃん - I admit, that was a little cruel. +1 for calling me on it. But I do think that the fact that in English 'flirt' can have positive connotations but it's hard to find an equivalent Japanese word with positive connotations reflects cultural differences to some degree.
Aug
5
comment Does the Japanese language only have negative terms for flirting?
No doubt it could be interpreted as an excuse. That's why it's so hard to find a good way to express this - culturally excuses are more acceptable than being direct.
Aug
4
comment What would be the best way to express the term 'master', as in a master of some sport?
Yes, 選手is not what I'm looking for. I'm looking for an outstanding player. These are good suggestions - I like 天才. I think that fits well.
Aug
4
comment What would be the best way to express the term 'master', as in a master of some sport?
+1 Oh, of course! I should have thought of that. I use プロ myself all the time in english and Japanese. Good one.