837 reputation
39
bio website
location
age
visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen Aug 16 '11 at 5:10

Aug
3
comment Is there a polite saying like “May I?”
Hehe. Now I can give you the up arrow. :D Thank you for teaching me about itadaki no kanji because I wasn't positive about my response, Dave. :) I'm sure it's not in newspaper..., but I know old people sometimes use it to seem more professional. If some foreigner were to write it, though, we would say: "No! That's wrong!" Usually. I think that it shows you're very smart, though. Good job, Dave. :)
Aug
3
awarded  Editor
Aug
3
answered Is there a polite saying like “May I?”
Aug
3
revised Is there a polite saying like “May I?”
took out wrong kanji changed to 'ke' where 'ki' was used.
Aug
3
comment Is there a polite saying like “May I?”
I'm actually not 100% positive that it's not the kanji, but I know it's spelling it wrong to use that kanji, even if I'm wrong about it being the correct kanji. So, I changed it, anyway. :)
Aug
3
suggested suggested edit on Is there a polite saying like “May I?”
Aug
3
comment Is there a polite saying like “May I?”
させていただきますか.... Good job. People never use kanji for that, even in newspapers, where the most kanji is used... @Dave いただき does not have kanji. 頂き means "the top of the mountain". Also, 頂きます isn't a word because 頂き isn't a pre-masu verb. 頂 is also いただき, but it's an alternate spelling. In this sentence, it doesn't make sense 'the top of the mountain done for you', also. Even Japanese people make the mistake, often... 笑.... Anyway, I'll change it for you. I still think your answer is very nice.
Aug
2
answered What is the こと in sentences such as あなたのことが好きだ?
Jul
27
comment What is usually written at the end of a slides presentation to imply “Thanks for listening”?
@op, you can say ~てくれてありがとう, generally, to thank people for favors they have done for you. ~て represents a て-form verb. In this case, 聞いてくれてありがとう could be okay, but ご清聴ありがとうございました is better. せいちょう means "attention" and the ご which precedes it is honorific language. I think you sound like Golem from Lord of the Rings if you fail to use honorific language when it is necessary. Anyway, noun+ありがとう means, 'thanks for that'. You would be saying, in an unGolemlike way: 'Thank you for your attention.'
Jul
27
comment What is usually written at the end of a slides presentation to imply “Thanks for listening”?
@sawa, If I use 0% full page zooming, your text is jarbled. If I use 10% full page zooming, your text is normal Japanese.... Weird, huh?
Jul
27
comment に vs で again: 前に vs 後で
When you use Chrome, do you see a square with a question mark where there should be a に in your example, and do you see a bunch of strange characters after "If there is preference of..."? I think I have another bug.
Jul
27
comment に vs で again: 前に vs 後で
dap. Good job. The English is hard to understand because it sounds a little manufactured, but it makes a lot of sense. Specifically, I like that your answer shows how 前で seems nonsensical.
Jul
27
comment How should I start an email when requesting something from someone I don't know well?
I also deleted an answer because I hadn't read the question fully. I was talking with my friends, and if you're just talking person-to-person, we think that you don't even have to say はじめまして. You can just write their name, state what you're asking for and say よろしくお願いします, and then sign it. It's kind of obtuse to go into a lot of respect language when just dealing with individuals. It's like calling them a target for a con, or an old person, or something. It's hard to describe, but someone might be very mad if you say '御免なさい' when you bump them instead of 失礼します or すみません.
Jul
27
comment How should I start an email when requesting something from someone I don't know well?
Well, I'm using chrome. I turned text zooming off. I have had issues with code and block quotes ever since I started using stack exchange. I tried highlighting all the text and using ctrl+q (block quote), and it didn't work. So, I used ctrl+k. Thanks for fixing it for me. I also wanted to add it to wiki because there's a lot of information that can be used in the letter. Not only the introduction, but the body, the language, the signature. I am sure that a professional office worker can find errors with this letter. It would be good to have lots of letters in wiki for solid reference.
Jul
27
comment Should I use keigo in this situation:
You should always use desu and masu at work, even when you talk to subordinates. It's just common respect. You should only use da and ru when you're at home or hanging out with friends, really.
Jul
27
comment What is a ダンディー?
@language hacker, I think that "dandy" isn't used a lot in English, but I think it's used by people in some off-the-cuff jokes about British English, in the United States. So, it shows up in literature and media, sometimes. They used the word dandy three or four times in the show Reno 911, for example, when they had a guest police officer come out from England. I think that you are kind of right about it not just being used for clothes, you know? It can be used for clothes or anything, and it just carries a meaning like: "just fine" or "alright" or "great" in English. :)
Jul
27
comment Do people actually ever say みょうにち?
Great info. Thank you. Is it just Tohoku?
Jul
27
comment Do people actually ever say みょうにち?
Wow, that sounds so cool. You should use it.
Jul
27
awarded  Commentator
Jul
27
comment に vs で again: 前に vs 後で
Right. Sorry, I do that all the time. My friends make fun of me for it. It's supposed to be 食べた. I changed it.