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seen Aug 16 '11 at 5:10

Aug
8
comment Does the Japanese language only have negative terms for flirting?
Oh, that sounds nice. In the situation you were talking about, where you're trying to confess to someone, though, they would probably take it that way. So, there's potential 否定的な意味合い, like you say.
Aug
8
revised Does the Japanese language only have negative terms for flirting?
Added an additional word that may be closer to an answer
Aug
8
comment Does the Japanese language only have negative terms for flirting?
@Dave ...A Japanese person wouldn't say, "You know I like you, but we shouldn't ignore each other," though, even if it were becoming a problem at work or something. They would just continue to have the conflict, most likely. So, I think that it would be interesting to try to forge ahead on this medium, also. It would probably be very hard ever help it take hold in the culture, though. You could just say like: 私はあなたのことを好きと分かってると思うけど、私は無視しない方がいいと思うよ。->'You know I like you, but we shouldn't ignore each other.' Japanese people'd never say that. It's grammatical, though. They would understand.
Aug
8
comment Does the Japanese language only have negative terms for flirting?
@Dave I decided, after our chat, ツンデレ is on-the-nose. ツンツン means 'acting strong' and 'acting like you don't care'. 照れる is like shy, pure feelings (i.e., 'I like her, but I can't say anything.'). So, ツン is like 'I pick on you', and デレ is like 'but my heart is melting' in the word ツンデレ. It has no negative implications (such as フローと's cheating implication). It's just a kind of feeling and interaction that people have that is a possible precursor to real love. If someone who is 照れてる gets イチャイチャ from their 好きな人, they're going to be SO happy! ...
Aug
8
comment Does the Japanese language only have negative terms for flirting?
@DaveMG let us continue this discussion in chat
Aug
8
comment Does the Japanese language only have negative terms for flirting?
That makes sense. We should talk in chat or something.... But anyway, I edited the last comment to try to fill the gap. With the understanding that it's not just reserved for high/middle school kids, there isn't a word for that kind of flirting. There's no 'slangy'/'cool'/'casual' way to say, "I was just flirting." To fill the gap, you have to explain it in Japanese: "In English-speaking culture...." It's a totally unique concept. Japanese people won't get it. Things like, "He's just having innocent fun," carry a totally different meaning. We can only come so close w/o a 'tone'.
Aug
8
comment Does the Japanese language only have negative terms for flirting?
@Dave Took out the personal advise for your liking, too. :)
Aug
8
revised Does the Japanese language only have negative terms for flirting?
Took out the personal advise.
Aug
8
comment Does the Japanese language only have negative terms for flirting?
@Dave Then the answer is no. There is no word. Any word about flirting is going to be strong, and there will be a chance of coming off as offensive. You can say 仲良くなりたい -> I just want to get along, or you can say 友達として-> just as a friend, or ただ話したかっただけ -> just chat, but you can't say "light flirting"/"joking" in the sense that high school students say it in English-speaking cultures. It doesn't make sense to say one thing and mean another. If you're flirting, you're flirting. You can say 誘いたいって言ってる (he/she's trying to hook up). That's the most innocent sense, but isn't it strong?
Aug
8
revised Does the Japanese language only have negative terms for flirting?
Added some more details.
Aug
8
answered Does the Japanese language only have negative terms for flirting?
Aug
7
comment Historical differences between colors that are i-adjectives and those that are simply nouns
Aw, dude! That book is sweet!
Aug
7
revised Historical differences between colors that are i-adjectives and those that are simply nouns
Re-ordering. There's a lot of text. Could use some help.
Aug
7
comment Historical differences between colors that are i-adjectives and those that are simply nouns
Can you tell me more about き?
Aug
6
revised Historical differences between colors that are i-adjectives and those that are simply nouns
added 3604 characters in body
Aug
6
comment Historical differences between colors that are i-adjectives and those that are simply nouns
@sawa, There's no such thing as 'adjective' in Japanese. It's really a subjective argument. People break the word after the suffix 'no' and call it a no-adjective to contrast it with a 'na' adjective using the same root word. This makes it a single word, and to correlate it with an English equivalent, we have to give it some kind of label. 病気の人 and 病気な人 both use adjectives with the root word 病気, but they have a different suffix, の and な. I suppose you could say the の means something other than '~ened' vs '~ly' or the adj 'sick' vs 'sickly' or 'sick-like', but it would remain subjective.
Aug
3
comment Historical differences between colors that are i-adjectives and those that are simply nouns
Hopefully some more research will tell us more about this topic. :)
Aug
3
answered Historical differences between colors that are i-adjectives and those that are simply nouns
Aug
3
awarded  Critic
Aug
3
awarded  Student