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seen Aug 16 '11 at 5:10

Aug
11
awarded  Scholar
Aug
11
accepted 以上 vs 以上 for numbers vs words: half full/half empty?
Aug
11
comment 以上 vs 以上 for numbers vs words: half full/half empty?
I guess 'are above' is what you would write if you were referring to something earlier in a text, so that makes sense. :)
Aug
11
comment 以上 vs 以上 for numbers vs words: half full/half empty?
And to answer your question, I guess that depends on whether you think of a speech or a document in terms of a scale.
Aug
11
comment 以上 vs 以上 for numbers vs words: half full/half empty?
Well there-in lies the issue. 'Everything above this point is included in cutting,' in text. 以上です at the end of a speech seems the reverse of the numeric sense, in your explanation. So, some of my friends and I are thinking that they're homophones and homonyms, but they're not synonyms. In terms of text, though, 略 means 'shorten'. So, 'shorten everything above' is 以上略. It's counting the words as numbers would be considered. 以上です -> 'things I wanted to say were before'..., and before means above? Interesting....
Aug
10
comment 以上 vs 以上 for numbers vs words: half full/half empty?
I just wonder why 'from the top' and 'from the bottom' both result in the same meaning, when dealing with percentages and combining 以上 or 以下.
Aug
10
answered 以上 vs 以上 for numbers vs words: half full/half empty?
Aug
10
asked 以上 vs 以上 for numbers vs words: half full/half empty?
Aug
10
comment Can I write Japanese name “Midori” this way - 緑?
The one I linked you to only has three readings for みどり, which are the only three I happen to have seen: 翠 (Incredible Green) 美鳥 (Beautiful Bird) 翠里 (Incredible Green Village). It's only really the rough translation based on the kanji meanings, though. Actually, interactions between words make it hard to translate true meaning. For example, many names end in 子, and we say 'child'. It's actually a kanji that older generations used in their name. It's not supposed to mean that, but Japanese people accept that people want it to mean that because the kanji means that.
Aug
10
comment Can I write Japanese name “Midori” this way - 緑?
There are many different ways to write the name みどり. Sometimes, people use a kanji that is never said as or み, みど, and they combine it with a kanji that is/is never used for ど and り or どり or り, and then they say, 'It's pronounced: "みどり". So, there's really infinite possibilities. Some of kanji listed in Flaw's post are names, some are not. Some are used as names but not pronounced as みどり when used as names. so... A "jisho" is a dictionary, and "namae" means name. You can look for "namaejisho" 名前辞書 or 'akachan...' (baby) namaejisho 赤ちゃん名前辞書. Here you are: namejiten.com.
Aug
9
comment What is the こと in sentences such as あなたのことが好きだ?
I agree, but I think that at least the last line of what Sawa wrote is also very important to note. Adding こと to the object of a sentence with an intransitive verb clarifies the object. It's strange that Japanese sentences can have objects, even though they are intransitive. Because they can, though, you have to take special care to speak clearly, sometimes, or you end up in one of those: "Wait,-did-you-mean-him-or-her?" conversations.
Aug
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comment Can I write Japanese name “Midori” this way - 緑?
It's a little confusing because the 翠 for a woman's name is used for a male bird's wings. It's just because the color, though. The male birds have far more beautiful wings than the female birds. There's no 'word gender' in Japan, either, and you may need to be an ornithologist to know. Anyway, people just know it means 'a very beautiful green'. It's used far far more often than 緑, but that one's also sometimes (really emphasizing rarely) used.
Aug
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comment Can I write Japanese name “Midori” this way - 緑?
@nCdy, I did that follow-up response (second comment). It 'splains the difference between katakana and hiragana. When in Japan, you have to write the reading of your name above your name, sometimes. If you're a foreigner (like from China), then you'd write katakana above your name. If you're native to Japan, you would write hiragana above your name. Also, if you're writing mail to someone in Japanese, you'd follow the hiragana for natives, katakana for non-natives standard. :)
Aug
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comment Can I write Japanese name “Midori” this way - 緑?
Maybe, but wouldn't the answerer know best? Maybe this is more specific: 翠 is used for female names. 緑 is sometimes, but less often, used for female names. If the person is Japanese, you would use みどり, hiragana, to write her name if you didn't know which kanji, or how to write the kanji. If the person were not Japanese, you would use katakana, ミドリ, because katakana is used for foreign names. And みどりの, with a name, would mean Midori's. You would hear みどりさんの, though. 緑の is an adjective form of the word green.
Aug
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answered Can I write Japanese name “Midori” this way - 緑?
Aug
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answered What's the difference between 〜以上は and 〜からには
Aug
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comment Does the Japanese language only have negative terms for flirting?
Good stuff, Dave. It's hard to get close. Maybe it's because Japanese people flirt in a different way. Ah! Jeeze! Thanks for the bounty! ;)
Aug
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awarded  Mortarboard
Aug
8
comment Does the Japanese language only have negative terms for flirting?
Only the first one sounds good. hehe.... I think I heard the second one in Naruto! :)
Aug
8
comment Does the Japanese language only have negative terms for flirting?
セツナイ!!! 何で祖言うことすんの? 絶対に切ないよ。