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Aug
14
comment Are there verbs that end with ず,づ, ふ, ぷ, しゅう, ちゅう and じゅう? Why not?
In the Meiji era, which was after the Edo era, they still had various dialects throughout Japan, Zhen. That's when they had major reforms.
Aug
14
comment Exceptional compounding forms
Tsuyoshi, it serves as a fine example. Anyone can edit anyone's answer. I don't think that konoha was chosen over mokunoha because of pronunciation, but I do think that it was chosen over kinoha because of pronunciation. I posted a comment about tongue twisters, but it was deleted. The way you make a tongue twister is by creating a series of syllables that cause the cheeks to fluctuate in and then out. Look some up and see for yourself.
Aug
14
comment Are there verbs that end with ず,づ, ふ, ぷ, しゅう, ちゅう and じゅう? Why not?
Yeah, that's a really good explanation. Some of them look like reforms, and some of them look to be natural. I wouldn't assume that they were all part of the reforms, Lukman.
Aug
14
comment Are there verbs that end with ず,づ, ふ, ぷ, しゅう, ちゅう and じゅう? Why not?
It's your answer above that says: "Note that these examples are all derived from Chinese words which originally had nasal endings."?
Aug
14
comment Are there verbs that end with ず,づ, ふ, ぷ, しゅう, ちゅう and じゅう? Why not?
@Zhen, It was. That's why they made the reforms. It still shares common features.
Aug
14
comment Are there verbs that end with ず,づ, ふ, ぷ, しゅう, ちゅう and じゅう? Why not?
You can go to goo.ne.jp and search by ~で終わる to look for 'words that end with ~'.
Aug
14
answered Are there verbs that end with ず,づ, ふ, ぷ, しゅう, ちゅう and じゅう? Why not?
Aug
14
comment Exceptional compounding forms
Also, did you delete my other comment? Jeeze, what's your problem? If you have a better answer, then post one. Or if you want to edit mine, go ahead. Don't harass me and delete my comments.
Aug
14
comment Exceptional compounding forms
I suggested that konoha was used rather than kinoha or mokunoha because it's easier to pronounce. I didn't suggest that at all in my answer. You read that into the answer. It was probably derived from kinoha, if it was even 'derived'. It's just easier to pronounce than the other possibilities. How do 'possibilities' and 'derivatives' mean the same thing to you? Maybe you weren't born with the nuance gene. Please, don't put words in my mouth.
Aug
13
comment Exceptional compounding forms
So, I'm suggesting that because kinoha is difficult to pronounce and konoha is easy to pronounce, the distinct form of 木 is used.
Aug
13
comment Exceptional compounding forms
I was just going through the possibilities to show how much more difficult alternative spellings could be to enunciate. Try saying this, and notice how your cheeks move in and out: "A big bug bit a bold bald bear and the bold bald bear bled blood badly; brisk brave brigadiers brandished broad bright blades; the sixth sick sheik's sixth sheep's sick."
Aug
11
answered Exceptional compounding forms
Aug
11
comment 以上 vs 以上 for numbers vs words: half full/half empty?
Maybe it's true, but it only kind of makes sense to me.... How does it mean 'more than' when you say 以上です after speaking? It actually means the opposite, 'There's no more.'
Aug
11
comment 以上 vs 以上 for numbers vs words: half full/half empty?
If you say, 'There's a party, and it's going to be fun!' In your writing, パーティのお知らせ, and you write the dates below, you use 以下に. Then when you say 'I love eating,' you say, いっぱい食べれたらこれ以上幸せなことはない。 meaning, "Nothing makes me happier than being able to eat a lot!" It considers the empty possibility of eating more. 話すことはこれ以上ない, seems backwards because it's like, "I don't need to talk, anymore. Everything has already been said," in consideration of the filled space, before. Even when people explain it to me, it seems like they always explain themselves backwards and forwards.
Aug
11
revised 以上 vs 以上 for numbers vs words: half full/half empty?
edited title
Aug
11
comment 以上 vs 以上 for numbers vs words: half full/half empty?
Here's the confusion.... If you are filling a cup with water, then 以上 is everything above what you have filled. If you are filling a page with words, 以上です is everything that has been filled (the proverbial water in the cup, rather than the space left). In speaking, 以上です as in これ以上ない again becomes the 'empty space' in the cup. It's everything after what you have already said. For example 話すことはこれ以上ない means, 'I have nothing more to say.' Even though it's kind of a negative form of 以上です, it has the same meaning. People don't say, 以上じゃないです, though. There's no real negative form....