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comment Can you make an adverb from a noun by adding に?
Heheh, yes. What I meant was that the idea of adjectives is so murky until they look special in their adverbial usage. So I really am wondering what Japanese adverbs mean to people
May
23
comment Can you make an adverb from a noun by adding に?
I asked a question and was led to an answer proposing that Japanese doesn't really have adjectives. So say 幸せ is an adjective. Or that it must be because we can make it into adverbs as you described. I want to come to agreement on what an adverb is because we've skipped the part about why 幸せ not a noun. I'm not sure why I think of it as an adjective, despite its meaning, other than that it conjugated in a certain way. Though I see how they are especially good at becoming this distinct class of thing we call adverbs. So what's a noun adverb look like, what's an example meaning of one?
May
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comment Can you make an adverb from a noun by adding に?
Heheh, my answer sucks, it was just too long for a comment. Can you make an adverb from a noun by adding に? I didn't go there because I'm not sure what we are talking about... I took a guess at the にする thing. So let's define our words, what is an adverb?
May
23
comment Can you make an adverb from a noun by adding に?
Correct me if I'm wrong but are you asking how complex ideas can become nouns?
May
23
comment Can you make an adverb from a noun by adding に?
My feeling about にする is that I don't think there's a general explanation of it that doesn't have dozens of bullet-points with sub-bullets. So, that's to say option three is perfect somewhere but there's a case for that sentence where option five is perfect. I think I see what you're asking about, but I don't know the grammatical term is... it sounds to me like you're asking about having noticed that sentences can become objects that can be treated like nouns, because they are things. But I think にする revealing that has misdirected you as to what allows that. It's not the actor in my opinion.
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answered Can you make an adverb from a noun by adding に?
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