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awarded  Popular Question
May
23
comment Can you make an adverb from a noun by adding に?
Heheh, yes. What I meant was that the idea of adjectives is so murky until they look special in their adverbial usage. So I really am wondering what Japanese adverbs mean to people
May
23
comment Can you make an adverb from a noun by adding に?
I asked a question and was led to an answer proposing that Japanese doesn't really have adjectives. So say 幸せ is an adjective. Or that it must be because we can make it into adverbs as you described. I want to come to agreement on what an adverb is because we've skipped the part about why 幸せ not a noun. I'm not sure why I think of it as an adjective, despite its meaning, other than that it conjugated in a certain way. Though I see how they are especially good at becoming this distinct class of thing we call adverbs. So what's a noun adverb look like, what's an example meaning of one?
May
23
comment Can you make an adverb from a noun by adding に?
Heheh, my answer sucks, it was just too long for a comment. Can you make an adverb from a noun by adding に? I didn't go there because I'm not sure what we are talking about... I took a guess at the にする thing. So let's define our words, what is an adverb?
May
23
comment Can you make an adverb from a noun by adding に?
Correct me if I'm wrong but are you asking how complex ideas can become nouns?
May
23
comment Can you make an adverb from a noun by adding に?
My feeling about にする is that I don't think there's a general explanation of it that doesn't have dozens of bullet-points with sub-bullets. So, that's to say option three is perfect somewhere but there's a case for that sentence where option five is perfect. I think I see what you're asking about, but I don't know the grammatical term is... it sounds to me like you're asking about having noticed that sentences can become objects that can be treated like nouns, because they are things. But I think にする revealing that has misdirected you as to what allows that. It's not the actor in my opinion.
May
23
answered Can you make an adverb from a noun by adding に?
May
13
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May
13
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May
13
revised How do you do a countdown?
added JAXA countdown example
Apr
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Apr
27
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Apr
27
comment Understanding the subtleties behind [noun]する vs [noun]だ
Interesting read for others thinking about adjectives and nouns: Japanese has no real adjectives at all
Apr
27
accepted Understanding the subtleties behind [noun]する vs [noun]だ
Apr
27
comment Understanding the subtleties behind [noun]する vs [noun]だ
Great to have your answer and comments. I've been incorrect in approaching Japanese adjectives with English thinking. I'll just stop trying to group them into my language's terms. I think that's all I needed to consider to give the check mark.
Apr
12
comment Understanding the subtleties behind [noun]する vs [noun]だ
@blutorange No, I'll leave it, that's an important point about mobile support. There's a vote for block quotes only used for longer Japanese passages, but I think your edit is a visual improvement too (not just a necessity for bold and italic keywords). Thanks again.
Apr
12
comment Understanding the subtleties behind [noun]する vs [noun]だ
@blutorange Thanks for the cleanup. I read on meta that block quotes were intended for English, and took a guess at underlining rather than bold. Are your changes based on a "JLU style guide" or something?
Apr
12
comment Differences between “何度も or 何度でも” and 何回も?
I think the でも version has a feeling of perseverance to it: "Despite countless failures she never gave up." Whereas the other feels like the result doesn't change. Keep in mind I can only offer that opinion as a comment.
Apr
12
comment Understanding the subtleties behind [noun]する vs [noun]だ
Many thanks! Still reading this over as I slowly get closer to giving an honest check mark. Do you happen to know of a JLU post about this adjectival aspect of nouns? I see what you mean, and I see my confusion now, but I'm wondering if someone has elaborated on this already (since meaning and dictionary classification can be contradictory, I wonder if it's been brought up).
Apr
10
revised Understanding the subtleties behind [noun]する vs [noun]だ
added some explanation of my reasoning/misunderstanding