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seen May 31 at 20:41

May
12
comment How are the noun 方【へ】 and the particle へ related?
Sjiveru, do you have a source? Frellesvig at least argues that what he writes <pye> really was pronounced with a glide in OJ.
May
8
comment Is それが人生{じんせい} , 仕様{しよう}が無{な}い, or something else the most natural equivalent to “that's life”, “c'est la vie”, etc?
I think the tone point is why "それが人生*さ*" is such a popular formulation of the phrase (I would have guessed it was the canonical one) -- helps the speaker signal non-pomposity.
May
8
comment Apparent reversals of conjugation patterns in classical 形容詞 and 動詞, origin?
Put another way, yes, you can posit stems ending in /-k/, but you'll probably still need to posit bases ending in vowels that can be used to generate "the /k/ stem", "the /s/ stem", etc.
May
8
comment Apparent reversals of conjugation patterns in classical 形容詞 and 動詞, origin?
It would be possible, but then you have to explain why it turns to /s/ sometimes, why the bare (no /k/) version is used in compounds, how all this works with /si/ adjectives (/uresi/, etc.). Most specialists consider it more parsimonious to posit bases ending in a vowel, with everything else an affix. However the idea that /ki/, /ku/, /kyere/ etc. are all part of the same family, starting with "the same" /k/, makes a lot of sense (especially since many of the /k-/ forms seem to have replaced older, not-obviously-related forms, e.g. infinitive /-mi/ -> infinitive /-ku/.)
May
5
comment Is there a “right” or “best” way to write this Okinawan expression for “cheers”?
That's an excellent point -- there might not be an "official" way to write Okinawan right now, but that hasn't always been the case, and back in the day hiragana was preferred. That has to have been a big influence on the present situation (even if the details of how the kana are used are different), one I shouldn't have overlooked.
May
5
comment On the two equivalents on maps of “you are here” (現在地{げんざいち} and 現在位置{げんざいいち})
No argument there! I should have restricted that comment to the case of these two potential entries specifically.
Jan
6
comment Reading of 退く meaning “Go away”
FWIW the Meiji bible says "サタンよ退け" with furigana indicating the reading しりぞけ.
Jan
5
comment How accurate is the ふりがな on Aozora Books?
The Japanese government isn't being prescriptive in the way the AF is. It's just dictating a standardized curriculum for schools (and by extension groups who have a legal obligation to write documents so that a person educated in a Japanese school can read them).
Jan
5
comment Accent changes in conjugation
@snailplane and all: thanks!
Jan
5
comment Accent changes in conjugation
@ZhenLin Half-assed matching of the style in the question (thought maybe that was the preferred way of writing it around here, implicitly attributing low initial mora to some later phonetic process). The LHH style for accentless words was failure to follow through on that idea, heh.
Jan
4
comment How accurate is the ふりがな on Aozora Books?
@ZhenLin And 匁 got the boot. O tempora etc.
Jan
4
comment When women use わ at the end of a sentence, is it different from よ?
@Ataraxia It can't be よわ. Has to be わよ.
Jul
30
comment When grandmas tell their kids お天道様がみてるよ, how do the kids know who お天道様 is?
Well, it's not as commonly used as "God" (that was a flaw in my analogy, I guess), and I don't know of any kids' books that use it, but I think most Japanese people have at least heard the word and know how it's used. (Silvermaple didn't say it was uncommon, just that people might not be able to define it exactly.) If you had a grandma that used it, you would learn it, because her use of the word would teach it to you. And if you didn't, eventually you would hear it from someone else. It may die out in a few generations if non-grandmas have stopped using it, of course, like any other word.
Jul
27
comment What is the correct veritable meaning of 水無月 and 神無月?
@Chris Vovin doesn't mention these two specific words at all (at least as far as I can see) -- I'm just quoting him more generally on the /na/ particle.
Jul
26
comment What is the correct veritable meaning of 水無月 and 神無月?
Er, /topo.to.hito/ = /topo.tu.pito/, 遠人
Jul
26
comment What is the correct veritable meaning of 水無月 and 神無月?
@Chris I picked Vovin because I remembered he had an idiosyncratic but well-argued view about this /na/, basically!
Jul
26
comment What is the correct veritable meaning of 水無月 and 神無月?
@ZhenLin He calls it a "genitive-locative case marker", but warns that the /tu/ in words like /taka.tu.sima/ and /topo.to.hito/ is a different morpheme which is, in his opinion, originally some sort of copula.
Jul
23
comment Why is「ん」the only kana without a vowel?
Labrune also writes extensively on this topic in The Phonology of Japanese (2012).
Jul
19
comment What is the meaning of 女子力?
One difference is the diff. between 女子 and 女. Another is that 女子力 implies a kind of active mastery, where 女らしさ is more of an emergent trait. Like any other kind of power, 女子力 is a means to an end.
Jul
18
comment Are 弱い相互作用 and 強い相互作用 unnatural?
@sawa I don't read very deeply in physics so I almost always encounter the idea introduced explicitly: "the four fundamental forces are called...". I do remember seeing it often used with the definite article, though, which is a way (unavailable in Japanese) of reminding the reader that the reference is to a specific type of interaction/force and not just to any and all interactions that could be characterized as weak.