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seen Mar 6 at 14:33

Jan
6
comment Reading of 退く meaning “Go away”
FWIW the Meiji bible says "サタンよ退け" with furigana indicating the reading しりぞけ.
Jan
5
comment How accurate is the ふりがな on Aozora Books?
The Japanese government isn't being prescriptive in the way the AF is. It's just dictating a standardized curriculum for schools (and by extension groups who have a legal obligation to write documents so that a person educated in a Japanese school can read them).
Jan
5
comment Accent changes in conjugation
@snailplane and all: thanks!
Jan
5
comment Accent changes in conjugation
@ZhenLin Half-assed matching of the style in the question (thought maybe that was the preferred way of writing it around here, implicitly attributing low initial mora to some later phonetic process). The LHH style for accentless words was failure to follow through on that idea, heh.
Jan
4
comment How accurate is the ふりがな on Aozora Books?
@ZhenLin And 匁 got the boot. O tempora etc.
Jan
4
comment When women use わ at the end of a sentence, is it different from よ?
@Ataraxia It can't be よわ. Has to be わよ.
Jul
30
comment When grandmas tell their kids お天道様がみてるよ, how do the kids know who お天道様 is?
Well, it's not as commonly used as "God" (that was a flaw in my analogy, I guess), and I don't know of any kids' books that use it, but I think most Japanese people have at least heard the word and know how it's used. (Silvermaple didn't say it was uncommon, just that people might not be able to define it exactly.) If you had a grandma that used it, you would learn it, because her use of the word would teach it to you. And if you didn't, eventually you would hear it from someone else. It may die out in a few generations if non-grandmas have stopped using it, of course, like any other word.
Jul
27
comment What is the correct veritable meaning of 水無月 and 神無月?
@Chris Vovin doesn't mention these two specific words at all (at least as far as I can see) -- I'm just quoting him more generally on the /na/ particle.
Jul
26
comment What is the correct veritable meaning of 水無月 and 神無月?
Er, /topo.to.hito/ = /topo.tu.pito/, 遠人
Jul
26
comment What is the correct veritable meaning of 水無月 and 神無月?
@Chris I picked Vovin because I remembered he had an idiosyncratic but well-argued view about this /na/, basically!
Jul
26
comment What is the correct veritable meaning of 水無月 and 神無月?
@ZhenLin He calls it a "genitive-locative case marker", but warns that the /tu/ in words like /taka.tu.sima/ and /topo.to.hito/ is a different morpheme which is, in his opinion, originally some sort of copula.
Jul
23
comment Why is「ん」the only kana without a vowel?
Labrune also writes extensively on this topic in The Phonology of Japanese (2012).
Jul
19
comment What is the meaning of 女子力?
One difference is the diff. between 女子 and 女. Another is that 女子力 implies a kind of active mastery, where 女らしさ is more of an emergent trait. Like any other kind of power, 女子力 is a means to an end.
Jul
18
comment Are 弱い相互作用 and 強い相互作用 unnatural?
@sawa I don't read very deeply in physics so I almost always encounter the idea introduced explicitly: "the four fundamental forces are called...". I do remember seeing it often used with the definite article, though, which is a way (unavailable in Japanese) of reminding the reader that the reference is to a specific type of interaction/force and not just to any and all interactions that could be characterized as weak.
Jul
18
comment Does the kanji 妾 still get used by women to refer to themselves?
Yeah, that could cause confusion. In that case I would probably use /ro:/ because the slashes are a sort of rough phonemic transcription, but that would be even less clearer to non-specialists than ろう, probably.
Jul
17
comment Does the kanji 妾 still get used by women to refer to themselves?
No particular reason, I just didn't see much point in using kana to indicate the sounds, so I figured I may as well leave it in romaji. If someone wants to edit it to a different style, I won't roll it back.
Jul
11
comment What is the etymology of the word プラスアルファ?
Thanks, @Dono! I'll be keeping an eye out for something more specific myself (if it can be said with such confidence to be a misreading, we should also have documentation of that specific event) but those sources certainly fall on the reliable side of the fence.
Jul
11
comment What is the etymology of the word プラスアルファ?
@Dono Do you have a good reference backing up the origin as a misreading of "+x"? A quick Googling revealed only unsourced hearsay. (Not challenging you on the specifics, just looking for a reliable account of the etymology.)
Jul
4
comment Why is 一緒に needed when it's already clear two people will be together?
@sawa I find both of those unnatural, but I think the verb has something to do with it too: "The kids fought w.o.t." (ok), "The kids fought t." (not ok), "The kids fought t. w.o.t." (not ok); but, "The kids played w.o.t." (ok), "The kids played t." (ok), "The kids played t. w.o.t." (not ok); but, "The kids worked t. w.o.t." (redundant, but more natural than "went shopping t. w.o.t.", and "worked together" feels like a constituent)
Jul
4
comment Why is 一緒に needed when it's already clear two people will be together?
@sawa Rephrasing to avoid that problem, "My mum and I went shopping together with my dad" also feels a bit unnatural (not ungrammatical), but "My mum and I went shopping with my dad" does not. So maybe even when "together" could function as a VP adverb, the combination of "together" and "with X" feels unnatural for semantic reasons (e.g. "Together" already describes the makeup and relationship of the participant group, which may "disallow" adding another participant using "with X"), and this motivates a reanalysis as "together with X", which is awkward.