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bio website no-sword.jp/blog
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visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen Mar 6 at 14:33

May
6
awarded  Enlightened
May
6
awarded  Nice Answer
May
2
comment Is there a difference between んがため and ために?
Unfortunately, this etymology is not correct. The source of the ん here is not ぬ but む, which you can think of as the ancestor to the modern -(y)ou verb ending. That's why it's 勝たんがために and not 勝ちんがために, for example.
Apr
28
awarded  Announcer
Apr
28
revised Usage of doubled non-past tense “た”
deleted 18 characters in body
Apr
28
answered Usage of doubled non-past tense “た”
Apr
26
comment Which kanji has the greatest number of strokes?
@ジョン Huh, you CAN do links in comments! Thanks. I don't think it's worth an answer, though, since as you say it really depends on how much you want to search. I'm sure someone, somewhere has proposed a kanji made of three "taito" (a la 晶 made of three 日s); would that then be the winner? If we're restricting ourselves to "real" kanji, is "taito" really real? (Wikipedia offers no evidence supporting this proposition, and some against it.) As your answer explains, it's like asking what the longest word in English is: the answer depends on how you define the set of acceptable candidates.
Apr
25
comment Which kanji has the greatest number of strokes?
I'm just gonna throw this in for trivia value: たいと (you can find it at Wikipedia). Undeniably on the Japanese side of the line, 84 strokes.
Apr
25
comment What is that expression used to generally mean “…is what I would say, but…”?
Variations of this one include "nanchitte" and "nantsutte", if that helps...
Apr
22
answered What is that expression used to generally mean “…is what I would say, but…”?
Apr
20
comment How do you use 〜と知る?
This is a great answer. What do you think about "と知りながら" (e.g. "奥さん自身嘘と知りながらそうおっしゃるんでしょう")?
Apr
13
comment Questions on the Japanese equivalent of “window of opportunity”
I think you are actually misunderstanding the concept of a launch window; it's not to do with weather, but rather with the motion of the target (the moon or whatever). You have to time the launch so your target will be where you plan to be at the time you plan to meet it. Which also means that missiles like North Korea's, designed to just go up and then down again rather than hit a moving target, don't have launch windows at all. (See Jesse's explanation of what 発射通報期間 actually means).
Apr
5
comment Why is there a 分 in 自分?
The source actually says that the 分 in 自分 means the same thing as the 分 in 本分, not that there is a direct etymological relationship between 本分 and 自分. (Sorry for the pedantry, but I think it's an important distinction.)
Mar
23
revised In what way is the negative form of a verb an adjective?
added 1239 characters in body
Mar
23
answered In what way is the negative form of a verb an adjective?
Mar
23
comment In what way is the negative form of a verb an adjective?
Also, if you wouldn't mind, would you expand on/clarify your final sentence? It seems interesting, but I don't understand what you mean.
Mar
23
comment In what way is the negative form of a verb an adjective?
"Presumably the old suffixes required finite verb forms, and were lost when the morphologically finite forms disappeared, replaced by the morphologically non-finite forms that had the same meaning (i.e. -ない)." -- By "required finite verb forms", do you mean to argue that, for example, the negative verb ending ぬ ("attributive/non-finite") was lost along with ず ("predicative/finite") as a sort of package deal?
Mar
18
revised History of 十干(じっかん)and modern uses
Fixed typo (one instance of "kō" was "otsu")
Mar
17
comment Meaning of 真逆, how it is different from 逆
Perhaps you dislike it because (a) it is new, and associated with a sociolect you dislike, and/or (b) it is a (native) Japanese prefix attached to a Sino-Japanese morpheme, which is not unheard of but less common than other patterns.
Mar
13
comment How do you emphasize a word similar to using “The” in English
Nap, what you mean is a bit unclear to me too. The first thing that occurred to me is this sort of usage: "Is he an authority on John Lennon?" "He's THE authority on John Lennon!" Maybe you could provide "non-emphasized" versions of your sample sentences, to show by contrast what you mean.